nonfluent aphasia


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nonfluent aphasia

[′nän‚flü·ənt ə′fā·zhə]
(psychology)
Aphasia characterized by effortful articulation and loss of syntax, but relatively well-preserved auditory comprehension; generally the result of injury to the speech zone anterior to the Rolandic fissure. (Broca's area). Also known as Broca's aphasia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our results show the benefit of melody-based treatment for a patient with moderate-severe nonfluent aphasia, more than three years following traumatic brain injury with focal lesions in the left frontotemporal areas due to hemorrhages.
Mechanism of improved speech production by voice cues in nonfluent aphasia patients.
Improved Language in a Chronic Nonfluent Aphasia Patient Following Treatment with CPAP and TMS.
In reviewing this book, I would like to discuss two critical issues which arise from the initial premise that fluent aphasia is a clearly definable entity to be separated from nonfluent aphasia. Although by focusing her book on presenting and defining fluent aphasia, Edwards fills a gap in the literature successfully, my first issue concerns the need to classify aphasic patients at all as to fluency and if it may not be more beneficial to view fluent and nonfluent aphasics as two ends of a continuous spectrum rather than two distinctly definable syndromes.
P1 is a 65-year-old right-handed woman, who was 7 years postonset from a left temporal stroke, which resulted in nonfluent aphasia and right hemiparesia.
Code, "Nonfluent aphasia and the evolution of proto-language," Journal of Neurolinguistics, vol.
In an fMRI study of two people with residual nonfluent aphasia who received an intention treatment and a comparable attention treatment without an intention component, Crosson et al.
She was 54 years postonset at the time of this study, and her language indicated nonfluent aphasia with alexia, agraphia, and apraxia of speech.
Ho et al., "Overt naming fMRI pre- and post-TMS: two nonfluent aphasia patients, with and without improved naming post-TMS," Brain and Language, vol.
In an individual with nonfluent aphasia, treatment resulted in improved picture naming for nouns and verbs and generalized increases in numbers of grammatical sentences and content words following noun therapy.
Since patients with aphasia may or may not also present with dysarthria, we used motor-speech impairment tasks that assess articulation, rate, intensity, and resonance to determine the presence of dysarthria and language tasks that assess grammatical form, phrase length, content, melodic line, articulatory agility, and word finding to determine nonfluent aphasia.