nonjurors

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nonjurors

[Lat.,=not swearing], those English and Scottish clergymen who refused to break their oath of allegiance to James II and take the oath to William III after the Glorious RevolutionGlorious Revolution,
in English history, the events of 1688–89 that resulted in the deposition of James II and the accession of William III and Mary II to the English throne. It is also called the Bloodless Revolution.
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 of 1688. They upheld the principles of hereditary succession and the divine right of kings, and their refusal to recognize William as king led to their removal from office. In England, the original nonjurors included William SancroftSancroft, William
, 1617–93, English prelate, archbishop of Canterbury. His opposition to Calvinist doctrine caused him to remain abroad during the latter part of the Commonwealth.
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, archbishop of Canterbury, some bishops, and about 400 other members of the clergy; their ranks were later augmented by those who refused (1714) to take the oath of allegiance to George I. In Scotland, most of the Episcopal clergy became nonjurors when their church was disestablished (1690) in favor of Presbyterianism. Many nonjurors were active in the rising of the JacobitesJacobites
, adherents of the exiled branch of the house of Stuart who sought to restore James II and his descendants to the English and Scottish thrones after the Glorious Revolution of 1688. They take their name from the Latin form (Jacobus) of the name James.
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 in 1715, despite their doctrine of nonresistance to established authority. Later their numbers dwindled, however, and their attention turned to theology. Their high standard of thought was notable and influential in its day. The Bangorian ControversyBangorian Controversy
, religious dispute in the Church of England during the early part of the reign of George I. Benjamin Hoadly, bishop of Bangor, Wales, delivered a sermon (1717) before the king in which he denied that the church had any doctrinal or disciplinary authority.
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, in which nonjuror William LawLaw, William,
1686–1761, English clergyman, noted for his controversial, devotional, and mystical writings. One of the nonjurors, Law was deprived of his fellowship in Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and lost all chances for advancement in the church.
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 was prominent, precipitated the prorogation of the convocation of the Church of England in 1717. The exiled Stuart pretenders continued to appoint nonjuring bishops, including Jeremy CollierCollier, Jeremy,
1650–1726, English clergyman. Collier was imprisoned as one of the nonjurors, who refused to pledge allegiance to William III and Mary II. He later was outlawed (1696) for absolving on the scaffold two of those involved in the assassination plot against
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, preserving the nonjuring episcopal succession until 1805.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The nonjuror Charles Leslie accused Owen, with some justification, of having cribbed much of his pamphlet from the arguments of the managers for the lords in their free conference with the House of Commons on 16 Jan.
The lack of documentation, combined with the assumption of allegiance to the Stuarts, yields the conclusion that Johnson was a Nonjuror.
For having discovered and preserved the major Rochester sources which now reside in Harley MS 7003 and at Longleat in volume 2 of the Portland Papers and volume 27 of the Thynne Papers, George Harbin, antiquarian scholar and nonjuror priest, deserves recognition on a new and somewhat unlikely count-as guardian of the libertine Earl of Rochester's textual memory.
The phrase "Observe but here the easy Precepts given" was originally "Observe but here the Laws and Precepts given." Finch's revision emphasizes an allegiance to spiritual precepts by removing the worldly oaths that her husband refused as a Nonjuror. In spite of her radical deletion of "laws," however, even the revised line articulates a spiritual restoration as opposed to a political, Jacobite, one.
The second section considers how Loyalists dealt with the outcomes of their actions and their inability to win the war, including lawyers who helped Loyalists regain their confiscated property, Breed and Ruth Batcheller's experiences of Loyalism in New Hampshire, pacifist nonjurors in Pennsylvania, how Loyalists were reintegrated into the US, how historian David Ramsay plagiarized a large part of his history of South Carolina from Loyalist Alexander Hewatt, and Loyalists who resettled in the Canadian Maritime provinces.
(Conquest of Grenada, Part One, 5.1.44-45, in Dramatick Works, 3:81) Kent can usefully be compared to the nonjurors and Jacobites of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.
(8) The Anglicans who were committed to cordial relations with Eastern Orthodoxy were often members of the "high church" party in the Church of England, a party composed of Tractarians, NonJurors and their friends.
Although Jebb and Anderson, both Nonjurors, maintain a Jacobite focus upon Mary Stuart's character and argue against the authenticity of the casket materials, by reprinting these materials they keep alive her construction as a literary, as well as a political figure, in a departure from her representation in the seventeenth century.
Courts have held that when jurors merely text message, call, or post information online about a case to nonjurors, these are insufficient grounds for a mistrial.
Considering the book's focus on oaths, one would have liked a longer examination of the Nonjurors who would have provided a useful contrast to the Covenanters.
presence of individuals (nonjurors or alternates) and recording devices
The second was designed to strengthen the Protestant interest by enforcing the laws against Roman Catholics: Lechmere spoke so virulently on this matter in the House of Commons that a number of Catholics and nonjurors felt they would have to leave the country.