nonjurors


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nonjurors

[Lat.,=not swearing], those English and Scottish clergymen who refused to break their oath of allegiance to James II and take the oath to William III after the Glorious RevolutionGlorious Revolution,
in English history, the events of 1688–89 that resulted in the deposition of James II and the accession of William III and Mary II to the English throne. It is also called the Bloodless Revolution.
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 of 1688. They upheld the principles of hereditary succession and the divine right of kings, and their refusal to recognize William as king led to their removal from office. In England, the original nonjurors included William SancroftSancroft, William
, 1617–93, English prelate, archbishop of Canterbury. His opposition to Calvinist doctrine caused him to remain abroad during the latter part of the Commonwealth.
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, archbishop of Canterbury, some bishops, and about 400 other members of the clergy; their ranks were later augmented by those who refused (1714) to take the oath of allegiance to George I. In Scotland, most of the Episcopal clergy became nonjurors when their church was disestablished (1690) in favor of Presbyterianism. Many nonjurors were active in the rising of the JacobitesJacobites
, adherents of the exiled branch of the house of Stuart who sought to restore James II and his descendants to the English and Scottish thrones after the Glorious Revolution of 1688. They take their name from the Latin form (Jacobus) of the name James.
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 in 1715, despite their doctrine of nonresistance to established authority. Later their numbers dwindled, however, and their attention turned to theology. Their high standard of thought was notable and influential in its day. The Bangorian ControversyBangorian Controversy
, religious dispute in the Church of England during the early part of the reign of George I. Benjamin Hoadly, bishop of Bangor, Wales, delivered a sermon (1717) before the king in which he denied that the church had any doctrinal or disciplinary authority.
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, in which nonjuror William LawLaw, William,
1686–1761, English clergyman, noted for his controversial, devotional, and mystical writings. One of the nonjurors, Law was deprived of his fellowship in Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and lost all chances for advancement in the church.
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 was prominent, precipitated the prorogation of the convocation of the Church of England in 1717. The exiled Stuart pretenders continued to appoint nonjuring bishops, including Jeremy CollierCollier, Jeremy,
1650–1726, English clergyman. Collier was imprisoned as one of the nonjurors, who refused to pledge allegiance to William III and Mary II. He later was outlawed (1696) for absolving on the scaffold two of those involved in the assassination plot against
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, preserving the nonjuring episcopal succession until 1805.
References in periodicals archive ?
The similarity between Kent and the nonjurors is not just an accidental similarity.
These include Jennens' political status as a nonjuror (2) as well as his extensive knowledge of and interest in topics including literature, art, music, architecture, and theology, as illustrated by his letters and extensive library and art collections.
(20) Harbins correspondence from his early years in the west country has not survived, but it is safe to assume that he quickly made contact with his Malet in-laws, although given that Harbin as a nonjuror was officially an outlaw, Baldwin Malets status as a minor functionary of the Williamite regime may initially have set limits to their intimacy.
(25) John Findon, "The Nonjurors and the Church of England, 1679-1716" (D.Phil.
With the accession of William and Mary he joined the group of so-called "nonjurors" who refused to take an oath of allegiance to the new sovereigns, considering themselves still bound by their earlier oaths to James.
See also the earlier work of Thomas Lathbury, A History of the Nonjurors (London: Pickering, 1845).
Johnson said, of Isaac Bickerstaffe's play The Hypocrite, that 'he did not think the character just as to the Methodists, but it was very just as to the Nonjurors' (Private Papers, X, 50-1).
Section 1508 of the federal criminal code bars recording of the deliberations or voting of grand or petit juries; the statute also bars nonjurors from listening to or observing such proceedings.(191) The statute does not prohibit a juror from taking notes for the purpose of assisting her to perform her duties as a juror.(192) If courts are to begin to experiment with the recording of jury deliberations, without opening the floodgates to other types of court-authorized recording of juries (such as television broadcast or observation by researchers), the statute must be amended.
In our system, a properly informed criminal jury given the proper evidence is always entitled to acquit a defendant; no other official can reverse that decision, no matter how "erroneous" it seems to nonjurors. On some issues, juries are the ultimate referees, who are infallible because they are final.(152) Because it is the Sixth Amendment that requires certain jury decisions to be treated as nonerroneous acquittals, the Fifth Amendment Double Jeopardy Clause here merely piggybacks, specifying the legal effect of these acquittals in future proceedings.(153) Finally, my approach helps to identify a range of penalties that can be imposed on players who cheat or commit fouls.
The custom of instructing jurors not to make up their minds or discuss the case before the end of the trial was an off-shoot of the rule barring expressions of opinion by jurors to nonjurors regarding the verdict before the end of the trial.
Locke, in fact, came to agree, insisting by 1690 on the oath of allegiance to William as a condition of citizenship, threatening to ostracize the nonjurors, or those who refused to take it.
Having been appointed, at the age of 21, maid of honour to Mary of Modena, the future wife of James II, she (and her husband) remained loyal to James when he was forced into exile by the Glorious Revolution of 1688, and were among the Nonjurors who refused to take the oath of allegiance to the new monarchs William and Mary.