nonjurors


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nonjurors

[Lat.,=not swearing], those English and Scottish clergymen who refused to break their oath of allegiance to James II and take the oath to William III after the Glorious RevolutionGlorious Revolution,
in English history, the events of 1688–89 that resulted in the deposition of James II and the accession of William III and Mary II to the English throne. It is also called the Bloodless Revolution.
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 of 1688. They upheld the principles of hereditary succession and the divine right of kings, and their refusal to recognize William as king led to their removal from office. In England, the original nonjurors included William SancroftSancroft, William
, 1617–93, English prelate, archbishop of Canterbury. His opposition to Calvinist doctrine caused him to remain abroad during the latter part of the Commonwealth.
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, archbishop of Canterbury, some bishops, and about 400 other members of the clergy; their ranks were later augmented by those who refused (1714) to take the oath of allegiance to George I. In Scotland, most of the Episcopal clergy became nonjurors when their church was disestablished (1690) in favor of Presbyterianism. Many nonjurors were active in the rising of the JacobitesJacobites
, adherents of the exiled branch of the house of Stuart who sought to restore James II and his descendants to the English and Scottish thrones after the Glorious Revolution of 1688. They take their name from the Latin form (Jacobus) of the name James.
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 in 1715, despite their doctrine of nonresistance to established authority. Later their numbers dwindled, however, and their attention turned to theology. Their high standard of thought was notable and influential in its day. The Bangorian ControversyBangorian Controversy
, religious dispute in the Church of England during the early part of the reign of George I. Benjamin Hoadly, bishop of Bangor, Wales, delivered a sermon (1717) before the king in which he denied that the church had any doctrinal or disciplinary authority.
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, in which nonjuror William LawLaw, William,
1686–1761, English clergyman, noted for his controversial, devotional, and mystical writings. One of the nonjurors, Law was deprived of his fellowship in Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and lost all chances for advancement in the church.
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 was prominent, precipitated the prorogation of the convocation of the Church of England in 1717. The exiled Stuart pretenders continued to appoint nonjuring bishops, including Jeremy CollierCollier, Jeremy,
1650–1726, English clergyman. Collier was imprisoned as one of the nonjurors, who refused to pledge allegiance to William III and Mary II. He later was outlawed (1696) for absolving on the scaffold two of those involved in the assassination plot against
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, preserving the nonjuring episcopal succession until 1805.
References in periodicals archive ?
25) John Findon, "The Nonjurors and the Church of England, 1679-1716" (D.
As early as 1679 Henry Dodwell, who would eventually become a Nonjuror, began to develop a highly exclusivist Anglican theology which in turn helped to shape the theology of the High Church party.
For the Nonjuror Charles Leslie, a bitter opponent of Tillotson, Burnet, and other Latitudinarian divines in the Trinitarian controversy, (42) Owen's warning spoke volumes about the religious motives of the episcopal opponents of the bill: "Now it is out
The story is carried with economy through the eighteenth century, recounting the contributions of the Nonjurors and Scottish Episcopalians who--significantly for the thesis of the work--did not link a high theology with ceremonial innovation (27).