provider

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provider

provider

An organization that offers services to another. It may refer to an Internet provider (see ISP), a common carrier (see network provider), an application provider (see ASP) or a hardware provider (see cloud computing).
References in periodicals archive ?
Nonphysician providers per physician: number of NPs and PAs divided by number of FTE physicians
Network physicians and nonphysician providers are paid on a discounted fee-for-service basis, and PCPs receive a year-end bonus based on performance.
Our results suggest that, after controlling for patient-specific factors, care initiated by nonphysician providers is the most economical.
She includes staff for phones, the front office, the visit, the billing office, medical records, and part-time and virtual staff and nonphysician providers, as well as chapters on talent management, compensation, and incentive plans.
3 million, including administrative staff, physicians and nonphysician providers.
It can include even nonphysician providers if the facts are clear and the intent of the statutes is violated.
Coalition for Patients' Rights: a multidisciplinary group of health professional organizations that monitors and seeks to defeat organized medicine's efforts to limit scope of practice for nonphysician providers
The cost estimate also does not include all of the expenses related to diabetes, such as over-the-counter medications or office visits to nonphysician providers other than podiatrists (such as optometrists or dentists).
Physicians were significantly more likely to identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as an expected postevent psychological disorder than nonphysician providers.
With workforce modifications and cost containment major issues in health care delivery, the use of nonphysician providers has steadily increased in both primary care and specialty practices.
Efforts to provide medical information to the non-academically based provider are increasing in numbers; studies such as Ellen Hall's (1995) indicate that nonphysician providers, such as physical therapists, have an increased need for medical information as they branch out from hospital-based practices to private practices.
Some experts have raised concerns about an oversupply of specialists who rely heavily on government funding for training, while, at the same time, licensure laws and Federal reimbursement regulations restrict nonphysician providers from entering the health care marketplace.