noon

(redirected from noontide)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to noontide: noontime

noon

The time of day at which the Sun crosses the local meridian and is at its highest point above the horizon. This time differs from 12.00 local time by up to about 15 minutes before or after midday, the amount – the equation of time – depending on the time of year.

Noon

 

the moment at which, for a given point on earth, the center of the sun (the true sun or the mean sun) is in the upper culmination. The apparent noon corresponds to a meridian transit by the true sun, while mean noon corresponds to a transit by the mean sun. The time at which noon occurs depends on the geographic longitude. Noon begins one hour later for every 15° of longitude to the west.

noon

[nün]
(astronomy)
The instant at which a time reference is over the upper branch of the reference meridian.

noon

The time at which the center of the sun transits a particular meridian.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vivian Bird (Newport Beach, CA: The Noontide Press, 1982), lxi.
John Ervine ended his introduction with the speeches from act 5 of The Tempest, when Prospero remembers how he had "bedimm'd / The noontide sun" and opened graves to make the dead walk, "By my so potent art.
I wound my way down to the lower pasture and found the cows lying there where the road curved right and a few oaks made a noontide shade.
I want you in the morning When the dawn comes stealing in; I want you at the noontide, 'Mid the bustle and the din.
Dybbroe Moller's exhibition--his US solo debut--was titled "The Demon of Noontide," and this work's meeting of intellectual curiosity and abstracted, distracted game playing made for a neat evocation of cultured ennui.
The Demon-king's appearance ("All shagged with hair, wild, strange in shape and show"), his eagerness to show Irza the living springs, noontide shades, spice breathing groves, and to select for her sweet roots, cool waters and lovely fruits recall the knowledge Caliban shared with Prospero and Miranda.
He could afford to enjoy that mid-day break because he rose early and wrote quickly, knowing that "sommat to eat" and the regular bottle of champagne beckoned at the end of that noontide full-stop.
Another problem with this account of why Prospero renounces his magic is that in the same soliloquy, leading up to this renunciation, he dwells at some length on the remarkable achievements of what he terms "my so potent art": "I have bedimm'd / The noontide sun, call'd forth the mutinous winds .
Prospero's claim to be able to raise the dead is all the more striking for coming last in a litany of his powers: he has "bedimmed / The noontide sun, called forth the mutinous winds" (5.
John Cowell, A Noontide Blazing: Brigid Lyons Thornton, Rebel, Soldier, Doctor (Blackrock, Co.
For more on Flaubert in this context, see Richard Kuhn's literary history of ennui, The Demon of Noontide.
This period, the noontide of medieval German literature under the Hohenstaufen emperors, was as remote from the genesis of the epic as we are from the thirteenth century.