noon

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Related to noontide: noontime

noon

The time of day at which the Sun crosses the local meridian and is at its highest point above the horizon. This time differs from 12.00 local time by up to about 15 minutes before or after midday, the amount – the equation of time – depending on the time of year.

Noon

 

the moment at which, for a given point on earth, the center of the sun (the true sun or the mean sun) is in the upper culmination. The apparent noon corresponds to a meridian transit by the true sun, while mean noon corresponds to a transit by the mean sun. The time at which noon occurs depends on the geographic longitude. Noon begins one hour later for every 15° of longitude to the west.

noon

[nün]
(astronomy)
The instant at which a time reference is over the upper branch of the reference meridian.

noon

The time at which the center of the sun transits a particular meridian.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have bedimmed The noontide sun, called forth the mutinous winds, And twixt the green sea and the azured vault Set roaring war; to the dread rattling thunder Have I given fire, and rifted Jove's stout oak With his own bolt; the strong-based promontory Have I made shake, and by the spurs plucked up The pine and cedar; graves at my command Have waked their sleepers, oped, and let 'em forth By my so potent art.
What matters from the narrating poet's arch and elevated perspective is not the dance of self-disclosure or the transparent veils of self-concealment but the shallowness of youthful self-indulgence described as not even a beast's life but an insect's--"Childe Harold bask'd him in the noontide sun / Disporting there like any other fly" (1.
The struggle for survival is fought on two fronts: first, against the prison officials, "the mindlessness of evil made flesh" (1972: 228) and, second and more importantly, "against unreason/ Against the dark sprung moment of the trap/ Against the noontide thunderclap
This is part of it: Th' outstretching lake, imbosomed 'mong the hills, The eye with wonder and amazement fills; The Tay meand'ring sweet in infant pride, The palace rising on his verdant side, The lawns wood-fring'd in Nature's native taste, The arches striding o'er the new-born stream, The village glittering in the noontide beam.
It can still be read there today, and here's part of it: Th' outstretching lake, imbosomed 'mong the hills, The eye with wonder and amazement fills; The Tay meand'ring sweet in infant pride, The palace rising on his verdant side, The lawns wood-fring'd in Nature's native taste, The hillocks dropt in Nature's careless haste, The arches striding o'er the new-born stream, The village glittering in the noontide beam Kenmore's other famous visitor was Queen Victoria, who stayed at the neo-gothic, 19th century Taymouth Castle, which contained some of the most opulent interiors of the era.
Where plumy songsters strain their little throats, And fill th' air with their harmonious notes, Where lowing kine and bleating flocks repair From Phoebus' ray, to taste the noontide air.
But even at noontide, I fail to see how lap-dancing aficionados would intimidate.
Vivian Bird (Newport Beach, CA: The Noontide Press, 1982), lxi.
I wound my way down to the lower pasture and found the cows lying there where the road curved right and a few oaks made a noontide shade.
I want you in the morning When the dawn comes stealing in; I want you at the noontide, 'Mid the bustle and the din.
Dybbroe Moller's exhibition--his US solo debut--was titled "The Demon of Noontide," and this work's meeting of intellectual curiosity and abstracted, distracted game playing made for a neat evocation of cultured ennui.