normal state

normal state

[′nȯr·məl ′stāt]
(nuclear physics)
A term sometimes used for ground state.
References in classic literature ?
But Prince Andrew's mind was not in a normal state in that respect.
His excitement, of course, increased greatly at sight and touch of the individual for whose blood he had been making application: he struggled and struck with fury--but a drunken man is no match for a sober one; and, even in his normal state, Pelet's worn out frame could not have stood against my sound one.
This was so much her normal state, that Joe and I would often, for weeks together, be, as to our fingers, like monumental Crusaders as to their legs.
The door panels were in a normal state of smash, but the frame of the door resisted all besiegers, and behind it the owner carried on his varied pursuits--much in the same state of mind, I should fancy, as a border-farmer lived in, in the days of the moss-troopers, when his hold might be summoned or his cattle carried off at any minute of night or day.
Being first cousin to Lord Snigsworth, he was in frequent requisition, and at many houses might be said to represent the dining-table in its normal state.
It was evident from the general tone of the whole party, that they had come to regard insolvency as the normal state of mankind, and the payment of debts as a disease that occasionally broke out.
They might have made her unhappy had they found her happy, but as hopeless discontent was her normal state, and enjoyment but a rare accident, recriminatory passages with her father only put her into a bad humor, and did not in the least disappoint or humiliate her.
Having then reached my normal state, I discovered that I was half famished with hunger.
The room was in its normal state, and in it I passed an instructive quarter of an hour.
It tarried, however: days and weeks passed: I had regained my normal state of health, but no new allusion was made to the subject over which I brooded.
He was racially thrifty I suppose, and for him there must have been a great novelty in finding himself obliged to pay for travel ling--for sea travelling which was the normal state of life for the family--from the very cradle for most of them.
They began to suspect an epigenetic mechanism at work that could permanently recalibrate how the recipient's genes were being regulated, switching them from a pathogenic to a normal state.