normative

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normative

relating to, or based on, NORMS.
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, he seems to assume that, from the fact that my caring attitude cannot be anyone else's attitude but mine, it follows that my caring attitude cannot be normatively relevant for anyone but me.
then this will motivate us to realize the goods it constitutes and which contribute to defining for us a normatively higher, more fulfilling mode of life.
1) In part this may be because it appears normatively unproblematic; elected representatives by definition have authority to act in constitutional democracies.
Most scholarship challenging the right to elective abortion either denies the legitimacy of unenumerated rights not anchored in tradition, (13) or disputes the Court's assumption that the pre-viable fetus cannot be shown to be a normatively human being.
Bilgic suggests that trust learning is not only a normatively preferable alternative to fatalistic logic, but is also in the interest of receiving communities.
Hardworking bodies get concealed, augmented, and heavily made up in all the right places, although in this aesthetic enclave, such normatively coded optimizations are subject to redistribution.
Normatively these drivers sound coherent but past experience suggests that such a behaviour could lead India to an Escalation Trap.
Her main contention is that orgasm as a scholarly topic must be approached slantwise, since, as she explains, "queer theory--by which I mean those posthumanist and anti-identitarian critical approaches that are energized by thinking against the practices, temporalities, and modes of being through which sexuality has been normatively thought--has next to nothing to say of orgasm .
If traditions are porous and morphological, Kazmi argues, then there is no reason why an 'anarchism without adjectives' cannot be state-centric, ontologically and normatively.
Normatively, within any viable modern nation state, any non-state entity which tries to subvert and challenge its sovereign hegemony via violence and force, is tackled with brutal force.
The book argues that China lacks close friends or allies, and that China is not normatively integrated into the community of nations.
Maurer School of Law) comes down firmly on the side of such "activism," or as he would rather call it, "pragmatic judicial partnering" (with the legislature) which he notes is both descriptively accurate and normatively desirable.