normothermia


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normothermia

[‚nȯr·mə′thər·mē·ə]
(physiology)
A state of normal body temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of these consequences, the maintenance of normothermia during the perioperative and postoperative period is important not only for patient comfort, but for the prevention of complications and beneficial to patient discharge time from hospital.
(2009) investigated the use of surface CW as an adjunctive therapy to reduce shivering in both TH and controlled normothermia. The prospective study included 50 mechanically ventilated patients with brain injury treated with hypothermia (9 with intracerebral hemorrhage, 32 with subarachnoid hemorrhage, 3 with cardiac arrest, 3 with traumatic brain injury, and 3 with ischemic stroke).
The mean age of patients in both the normothermia and hypothermia groups was 31 to 42 years and was not a statistically significant variable.
To maintain normothermia, an IVTM catheter was inserted via the right subclavian vein.
I was able to get neurosurgery to decrease to 38[degrees]C from 38.5[degrees]C." Another stated, "Our institution has begun using [circulating water cooling pads] with SAH [subarachnoid hemorrhage] patients to maintain normothermia....
Guidelines for the management of severe TBI state "maintain normothermia," generally defined as a core temperature of 37[degrees]C (Hinkle, 2004), while the stroke guidelines discuss treatment of fever (Adams et al., 2003).
The system may be placed on standby for several hours prior to removal to determine whether the patient will be able to spontaneously maintain normothermia. Although gradual rewarming is indicated in accidental-hypothermia patients to prevent a complication called afterdrop, there are no published accounts of untoward effects from allowing the temperature of a neurosurgical patient to spontaneously return to normal as the CoolGard system is placed on standby or switched off.
Other measures that decrease ICP include maintaining normothermia or inducing mild hypothermia (32-34[degrees] Celsius) and preventing hypercapnia (Georgiadis, Schwartz, Aschoff, & Schwab, 2002; Hickey, 2003; McDonald & Carter, 2002).
Maintenance of normothermia can reduce the influence of body temperature on coagulation mechanism, drug metabolism and oxygen consumption, and reduce low temperature-associated complications (Prunet et al 2012; Khan et al 2011).
To maintain normothermia, anesthesiologists use active warming technology which includes blankets, mattresses, forced air warming (FAW), radiating heat lamps and warm infusions.
Providing and maintaining normothermia in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods is highly important in terms of patient safety, positive surgical results, and patient satisfaction (1, 2).