north aisle

north aisle

north aisle
The aisle of a church on the left side of a church as one faces the altar; so called because medieval churches almost invariably had their sanctuaries at the east end and the main doors at the west end.
References in classic literature ?
Yes, William Dewy, that was the man's name; and I can tell you to a foot where's he a-lying in Mellstock Churchyard at this very moment--just between the second yew-tree and the north aisle.
Heydour is home to St Michael and All Angels Church, a feature of which is stained glass in the north aisle dating from about 1380.
She was interred within the city's cathedral under the floor of the north aisle of the knave, where her gravestone can be seen.
A Benedictine foundation built of stone imported from Caen in the early twelfth century, its north aisle nave and tower served as parish church for the town.
The five vertical board-like panels that comprise the installation are set on the wall above the altar in the chapel of Peace and Justice at the west end of the north aisle of the nave in the position of a reredos.
The essay also reproduces two remarkable photographs, dating from 1862, that show the Victorian restoration at Stonegrave in progress, at the stage when the demolition and rebuilding of the twelfth-century north aisle housing the Thornton family burials was proceeding apace.
Another reason to explore its interior is to view the grave of Jane Austen, in the north aisle of the nave, where the simple gravestone makes no mention of her writing.
The archaeologists believe the coffins were associated with ground-works for the outer north aisle, which was added to the church in 1865.
Records show that the building regularly changed, extended and was, in part, rebuilt with the last major reconstruction taking place in 1906 when the entire north aisle was taken down and rebuilt.
Windows in the north aisle of the Cathedral tell the story of Father Damian working with the lepers in Hawaii, Dr Albert Schweitzer's hospital in Africa, Elizabeth of Hungary who founded hospitals in the 13th century, and William Booth who started the Salvation Army.
Hawksmoor solved the problem by creating an axial, centralised galleried space under a square lantern, focused on the communion table in an eastern apse, with the rest of the site occupied by an additional north aisle to serve as a vestry.
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