north aisle

north aisle

north aisle
The aisle of a church on the left side of a church as one faces the altar; so called because medieval churches almost invariably had their sanctuaries at the east end and the main doors at the west end.
References in classic literature ?
Yes, William Dewy, that was the man's name; and I can tell you to a foot where's he a-lying in Mellstock Churchyard at this very moment--just between the second yew-tree and the north aisle.
The five vertical board-like panels that comprise the installation are set on the wall above the altar in the chapel of Peace and Justice at the west end of the north aisle of the nave in the position of a reredos.
03A SECTION of roof beams at the parish church of Sefton had to be cut away by firemen to quell a blaze which broke out in the roof above the North aisle.
Another reason to explore its interior is to view the grave of Jane Austen, in the north aisle of the nave, where the simple gravestone makes no mention of her writing.
Church members are also hoping to see the north aisle of the building transformed into a community space.
At the far end of the north aisle of Llandaff cathedral lies an enigma, the striking armour-clad monumental effigy of David Mathew, a medieval gentleman with a remarkable popular reputation.
Improvements include the conservation of a 17th Century Cosin reredos screen, the installation of a toilet with disabled access, a servery in the north aisle and a toilet in the choir vestry, new carpets to the nave, sanctuary and two vestries and, over the next few months, the repair of the Victorian wrought-iron gates to the churchyard and the installation of specially-designed wrought-iron gates to the porch at the south door to replace dilapidated wooden ones.
Similarly the discussion of the fragment of standing masonry of the Barlings Abbey church, rebuilt in the early thirteenth century, shows unequivocal evidence for a north aisle (two roof corbels which on the authors' admission are primary), but we are told the aisle was not added until the fourteenth century rebuilding.
Purcell died at the height of his career, at the the age of 35, and following his death, officials at Westminster honoured him by unanimously voting that he be buried with no expense in the north aisle of the Abbey.
The archaeologists believe the coffins were associated with ground-works for the outer north aisle, which was added to the church in 1865.
The reredos in the north aisle of the church was painted by a artist who lived in Moseley, while the house beside the church gate was the home of the retired head of the Birmingham School of Art.
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