Nostalgia

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Nostalgia

Combray
village of narrator and family. [Fr. Lit.: Remembrance of Things Past]
Give My Regards to Broadway
singer sends well-wishes to home town. [Am. Pop. Music: Fordin, 531]
Happy Days
TV series viewed 1950s America through tinted lenses. [TV: Terrace, I, 337–338]
Krapp
passes the time by listening to tapes on which he had recorded his earlier experiences and reflections. [Br. Drama: Beckett Krapp’s Last Tape in Weiss, 244]
My Ántonia
book in which author recalls her precious child-hood years. [Am. Lit.: Magill I, 630–632]
ou sont les neiges d’antan
“Where are the snows of yesteryear?” [Fr. Lit.: Ballade des Dames du temps ladis, “Villon” in Benét, 1061]
References in classic literature ?
He sidled into the parlour as soon as he was at liberty, and said to my aunt in his meekest manner:
Trabb's judgment, and re-entered the parlour to be measured.
White as he was, there was a dangerous glitter in his spectacles; but while he still paused uncertain, he became aware that the driver of his fly was peering in from the street at this unusual scene and caught a glimpse at the same time of our little body from the parlour, huddled by the corner of the bar.
They walked into the parlour again; but Jacob, not apparently appreciating the kindness of leaving him to himself, immediately followed his brother, and seated himself, pitchfork grounded, at the table.
But no matter; here's Fanny in the parlour, and why should we stay in the passage?
Descending from the table, she left the parlour, and went upstairs, intending to enter the room overhead, which was the bedchamber at the back of the drawing-room.
I wont to do this neighbourly loike, and let them think thee's gotten awa' o' theeself, but if he cooms oot o' thot parlour awhiles theer't clearing off, he mun' have mercy on his oun boans, for I wean't.
On entering the parlour we found that honoured lady seated in her arm-chair at the fireside, working away at her knitting, according to her usual custom, when she had nothing else to do.
Nothing reigned for a long time but confusion; till at last the squire, having sufficiently spent his breath, returned to the parlour, where he found Mrs Western and Mr Blifil, and threw himself, with the utmost dejection in his countenance, into a great chair.
Amelia could hardly walk along the flags and up the steps into the parlour.
She came languishing out of her own exclusive back parlour, with the air of having been expressly brought-to for the purpose, from an accumulation of several swoons.
It clattered; and at that signal, through the dusty glass door behind the painted deal counter, Mr Verloc would issue hastily from the parlour at the back.