note


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Related to note: Loan note, NOTW

note,

in business: see promissory notepromissory note,
unconditional written promise to pay a certain sum of money at a definite time to bearer or to a specified person on his order. Promissory notes are generally used as evidence of debt.
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.

note,

in musical notationmusical notation,
symbols used to make a written record of musical sounds.

Two different systems of letters were used to write down the instrumental and the vocal music of ancient Greece. In his five textbooks on music theory Boethius (c.A.D. 470–A.D.
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, symbol placed on or between the lines of a staff to indicate the pitch and the relative duration of the tone to be produced by voice or instrument. The largest note value in common use in the United States is the whole note, an elliptical outline. Its value is halved by the addition of a stem. A solid note with a stem is the quarter note, the most usual metric unit in modern notation. The eighth note resembles the quarter note, with the addition of a flag at the end of the stem; with each flag added, the value of the note is again halved. For each note value, there is a rest of corresponding value; rests are named in the same way as notes, e.g., whole rest, half rest.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

note

[nōt]
(acoustics)
A conventional sign indicating the pitch of a musical sound by its position on a staff, and the duration of the sound by its shape.
The sound indicated by this sign.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

note

1. any of a series of graphic signs representing a musical sound whose pitch is indicated by position on the stave and whose duration is indicated by the sign's shape
2. a musical sound of definite fundamental frequency or pitch
3. a key on a piano, organ, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

note

(1) (Note) See Galaxy Note.

(2) (note) Typically a short text memo used to document something. Notes may also allow images to be inserted. Similar to email programs, applications that handle notes, such as Evernote and OneNote, combine all the user's notes into one file. See Galaxy Note.
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References in classic literature ?
As she took off her outer garment in the hall, she heard the footman, pronouncing his "r's" even like a Kammerjunker, say, "From the count for the princess," and hand the note.
"You cannot think I mean to hurry you," said he, in an undervoice, perceiving the amazing trepidation with which she made up the note, "you cannot think I have any such object.
Have you a memorandum of the number of that five-hundred pound note you paid away in France?"
When you were saying good-bye to her at the door, while you held her hand in one hand, with the other, the left, you slipped the note into her pocket.
Let us confess it, Cornelius was not so stupefied with surprise, or so beyond himself with joy, as he would have been but for the pigeon, which, in answer to his letter, had brought back hope to him under her empty wing; and, knowing Rosa, he expected, if the note had ever reached her, to hear of her whom he loved, and also of his three darling bulbs.
Again I staked the whole of my gold, with eight hundred gulden, in notes, and lost.
Arbuthnot': Note Pope's personal traits as they appear here.
When, however, we returned to Switzerland towards the end of June, and he found himself once more in the familiar and exhilarating air of the mountains, all his joyous creative powers revived, and in a note to me announcing the dispatch of some manuscript, he wrote as follows: "I have engaged a place here for three months: forsooth, I am the greatest fool to allow my courage to be sapped from me by the climate of Italy.
[Explaining to the note taker] She thought you was a copper's nark, sir.
And the note was accompanied by the usual envelope.
When the Professor had quite done with my mother's hand, and when I had warmly thanked him for his interference on my behalf, I asked to be allowed to look at the note of terms which his respectable patron had drawn up for my inspection.
They very first words I heard them interchange as I became conscious were the words of my own thought, "Two One Pound notes."