now


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NOW:

see National Organization for WomenNational Organization for Women
(NOW), group founded (1966) to support "full equality for women in America in a truly equal partnership with men." Its founder and first president was feminist leader Betty Friedan, author of The Feminine Mystique (1963).
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now

An expression used by ATC (air traffic control) when immediate compliance with an instruction is required to avoid an imminent situation.

NOW

feminist group working for social and political change. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1886]
References in classic literature ?
"Come, be candid," said the coadjutor, "you have not all your life followed the trade which you do now?"
Philip, stirring his punch, thought of his early friendship and his ardent expectation that Hayward would do great things; it was long since he had lost all such illusions, and he knew now that Hayward would never do anything but talk.
Turning over, as we are about to turn over, an entirely new leaf; and falling back, as we are now in the act of falling back, for a Spring of no common magnitude; it is important to my sense of self-respect, besides being an example to my son, that these arrangements should be concluded as between man and man.'
They nudged each other every moment -- eloquent nudges and easily understood, for they simply meant -- "Oh, but ain't you glad NOW we're here!"
"Oh," said Newman, "we are even now, and we had better not open a new account!
Well, I did so; never mind the details now, and never mind the bloody massacre the others had made of it before I came up.
I'm hustling, and now's the time that everybody that works for me has got to hustle.
Now's your time, ladies," answered the saucy Prince, keeping his place and looking sentimentally at the girls, who retired precipitately from the dangerous spot.
Now, any one of the fish that I have named is fit to set before a king.”
Good even went the length of again shaving the right side of his face; the left, on which now appeared a very fair crop of whiskers, we impressed upon him he must on no account touch.
Mr Squeers continued to look disconsolately about him, and to listen to these noises in profound silence, broken only by the rustling of his large coat, as he now and then moved his arm to raise his glass to his lips.
'I so seldom see you now, for you never come to the vicarage.