noy


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

noy

[nȯi]
(acoustics)
A unit of perceived noisiness equal to the perceived noisiness of random noise occupying the frequency band 910-1090 hertz at a sound pressure level of 40 decibels above 0.0002 microbar; a sound that is n times as noisy as this sound has a perceived noisiness of n noys, under the assumption that the perceived noisiness of a sound increases with physical intensity at the same rate as the loudness.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
'Some expats ask for more trail trekking as they want to spend whole day in jungle,' Noy says after a few minutes of walking, adding that many of the jungles trees are centuries old.
As he considers what he learned during his journey, Van Noy observes, "If we can recognize our role in creating the change, we can come around to our part in the healing, not just as individuals but as citizens of a much larger community."
Van Noy, the 40th pick overall in last year's NFL draft, showed up at the Provo-area school on Thursday to switch laptops.
Noy believes the two novels hold important lessons for Israeli readers.
we were never issued a public invitation) an extraordinary meeting of the NOY shareholders occurred in October 2008 where a type of
Noy Engineering can offer innovative design solutions and effective engineering services for the entire PA6 and PA6.6 chain.
Each cycle, it hydrolyses an ATP molecule and moves three sodium ions in one direction and two potassium ions in the opposite direction," New Scientist quoted Noy as saying.
A University of Oregon political science graduate, Van Noy, has worked as a Eugene-based organizer for the Democratic Party of Oregon.
They were punched and kicked in the head, leaving the woman with a broken arm and landlord Reuben Noy unconscious with his jaw broken.
Blogs are rapidly growing in popularity in the United States with nearly 12 million American adults posting to blogs and with nearly 57 million American adults reading blogs regularly (Kajder, Bull, and Van Noy 2004; Richardson 2005; EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative 2005; Marsan 2006).
Working with an adult group, Non-Military Options for Youth (NOY), YAA lobbied the Austin Independent School Board to significantly restrict military recruiters at schools and to ensure that the forms parents fill out on the first day of school include an opt-out box that prevents student information from being released to recruiters.