nuclear


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Related to nuclear: Nuclear war, Nuclear weapons, Nuclear stress test

nuclear

1. of, concerned with, or involving the nucleus of an atom
2. Biology of, relating to, or contained within the nucleus of a cell
3. of, concerned with, or operated by energy from fission or fusion of atomic nuclei

nuclear

[′nü·klē·ər]
(chemistry)
Pertaining to a group of atoms joined directly to the central group of atoms or central ring of a molecule.
(nucleonics)
Pertaining to nuclear energy.
(nuclear physics)
Pertaining to the atomic nucleus.
References in periodicals archive ?
That's a ludicrous statement," replies David Lochbaum, nuclear safety engineer for the Union of Concerned Scientists, when I ask him whether it's true that a catastrophic fire can't happen at a nuclear plant.
One day in 1975, some workers were checking a seal on the secondary containment building at the Browns Ferry nuclear plant in Alabama.
A huge thing at stake here is the state of nuclear power plants," says Nancy LaVista, attorney for the plaintiff families.
Schonegevel takes full advantage of this peculiar contrast, selectively disclosing these and other details in successive visual and narrative iterations to highlight the merciless, omni-directional destructive intensity of nuclear warfare--and its cruelly efficient, deadly assault on human innocence.
In addition, as the United States continues to fund studies for new tactical weapons designs such as the Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator, it further erodes the confidence-building effect of the negative security assurances.
Finally, the results of today's climate simulations--which are much more sophisticated than those that were available in the 1980s--suggest that even a nuclear exchange of just a few dozen weapons could cool Earth substantially for a decade or more.
American spy satellites saw North Korea building a good-size nuclear reactor in the early 1980s, and by the early 1990s, the C.
But with no ongoing production of new weapons, and, after September 11, 2001, with nuclear terrorism a newly-urgent threat, there is now little reason to have numerous separate sites scattered across the country.
The American, European, and Chinese presidents, united in their new alliance, issued a clear ultimatum threatening a nation, for the first time since the breakup of the Soviet Union, with nuclear retaliation.
Their support has alienated them from many in their former organizations, but indicates a more nuanced challenge to nuclear energy by some environmental activists, who are perhaps more willing to consider the nuclear option but still do not think it's the wisest choice.
First, after getting their toraborealis blown off in Afghanistan, our Islamic fascist antagonists may be seriously rethinking their hunker-in-the-bunker strategy; B, we're still waiting on the 411 for those weapons of mass destruction the RNEP would be hunting down; and 3, wagging fingers at Iran and North Korea about nuclear proliferation while poring over "Bunkie's" blueprints may turn out to be not the smartest arms-control strategy.