nuclear engine

nuclear engine

[′nü·klē·ər ′en·jən]
(nucleonics)
A type of thermal engine utilizing nuclear fission or fusion reactions to heat a working fluid for propulsive purposes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"It goes without saying that if you fire a missile with a nuclear engine of energy source, that nuclear material will end up wherever that missile ends up," said Hans Kristensen, director of the Nuclear Information Project at the Federation of American Scientists.
Hans Kristensen, director of the Nuclear Information Project at the Federation of American Scientists, said: "It goes without saying that if you fire a missile with a nuclear engine or energy source, that nuclear material will end up wherever that missile ends up."
Russia is testing a nuclear engine this year that could cut travel time to Mars from 18 months to just six weeks.
The Russian government allocated 500 million rubles ($16.7 million) in 2010 to start a project to build a spacecraft with a nuclear engine. The overall investment in the project is estimated at 17 billion rubles (over $580 million) until 2019.
Importantly, the dark-matter-burning phase prevents further gravitational contraction of the protostar, essentially "freezing" it in an embryonic stage before its nuclear engine can ignite.
With creation of NASA in 1958 followed quickly by President Kennedy's direction to land men on the Moon, Plum Brook supported the Nuclear Engine Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program.
MOL, the Manned Orbiting Laboratory, and NERVA, the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications, would be canceled a few years later.
Termination of the Rover/NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) program in January 1973 closed a significant chapter in the development of nuclear thermal rocket propulsion.
A baseline spacecraft using the older Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) technology and conventional aluminum-alloy propellant tanks was used for making mass comparisons.
According to the standard solar model, the nuclear engine at the sun's center pumps out a tremendous amount of energy.
The NACA morphed into the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in 1958, and it took 15 years and untold millions of dollars to build and operate the reactor, with much testing also devoted to Nuclear Engines for Rocket Vehicle Application and the Space Nuclear Auxiliary Program.
Nikolay Ponomarev-Stepnoi of the Kurchatov Institute said Russian-designed nuclear engines and propulsion systems were already at the experimental stage.
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