nuclear magnetism

nuclear magnetism

[′nü·klē·ər ′mag·nə‚tiz·əm]
(physics)
The phenomena associated with the magnetic dipole, octupole, and higher moments of a nucleus, including the magnetic field generated by the nucleus, the force on the nucleus in an inhomogeneous magnetic field, and the splitting of nuclear energy levels in a magnetic field.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the influence of a pulsed magnetic field from a coil, the aligned nuclei can be made to undergo 'coherent precession,' where the direction of the nuclear magnetism circulates for a time around the main magnetic field direction.
Different MR-based techniques have been developed to utilize nuclear magnetism induced in tissue to generate images of internal structure.
MR is based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), a phenomenon that describes atomic and nuclear magnetism. The term was coined by one of the early researchers in this area, Isador Rabi, who earned the Nobel Prize in physics with his colleague, Otto Stern.
Abragam, The Principles of Nuclear Magnetism, Oxford University Press, Oxford, England (1961).

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