nuclear number

nuclear number

[′nü·klē·ər ′nəm·bər]
(nuclear physics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The nuclear number would be much larger except for the hysteria over Three Mile Island and Chernobyl.
The neutron transmittance of the polarized lanthanum nuclear target, T is represented in terms of a transmittance of unpolarized target [T.sub.0], a nuclear polarization [P.sub.I], [[sigma].sub.0], a nuclear number density n, a target thickness L.
China's nuclear numbers remain small compared with those held
But these figures are dwarfed by other nuclear numbers. The Government recently bailed out the industry by bearing the cost of decommissioning current plants.
China's nuclear numbers remain puny compared with those of Russia and the United States.
The same holds true with nuclear numbers. Simply put, large arsenals buy statesmen little.
Moreover, leaders socialized to the dangers of nuclear weapons seem to understand that while numbers count, a small number of nuclear weapons are more than enough to dissuade the staunchest of rivals, even ones with comparably large nuclear numbers. Again, China's behavior is instructive.
As mentioned, China's nuclear numbers remain relatively small compared to those of the United States and Russia--approximately 400 nuclear weapons, with about 200 operationally deployed.
Adopting a minimum deterrent strategy, China's nuclear numbers remain relatively small compared to the large numbers held by the United States and Russia.

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