nuclear power plant


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nuclear power plant

[′nü·klē·ər ′pau̇·ər ‚plant]
(mechanical engineering)
A power plant in which nuclear energy is converted into heat for use in producing steam for turbines, which in turn drive generators that produce electric power. Also known as atomic power plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Chashma Nuclear Power Plants Unit1 and Unit2, built with the assistance of China were also operating successfully', he added.
Earlier Kazakh President Nursultan ordered the construction of the nuclear power plant.
So "Yes" nuclear energy is the solution to energy crisis of Pakistan and this can only be possible by having more nuclear power plants.
But when the plant was completed and ready for licensing in 1986, Marcos was ousted by a people's revolt and the Chernobyl nuclear disaster happened in what was then the Soviet Union, raising safety concerns on all nuclear power plant projects across the world.
We can see that accidents as in Fukushima do not affect decisions to have and operate nuclear power plants," Yildiz noted.
Skeptics still harbor many of the objections that have slowed or stopped the construction of new nuclear power plants, but rising concerns about the cost and security of energy supplies and global climate change have reframed the debate in terms more favorable for nuclear power advocates.
One of these describes potassium iodide as "an over-the-counter medication that can protect one part of the body--the thyroid--if a person is exposed to radioactive iodine released during a nuclear power plant emergency.
The Radiation and Public Health Project (RPHP), a nonprofit research center in New York City, recently released a study linking increased incidence of childhood cancers to areas near nuclear power plants.
Taking a nuclear power plant out of service is a bit like trying to close a very large Pandora's box.
If radioactive particles, or nuclides (NEW-clides) escape into the atmosphere from a nuclear power plant or factory, wind currents can blow particles over cities, countries, even around the world.
Twenty-four-year-old Jim Horn, an engineer new to California's Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, was flipping through a copy of the reactor's blueprints when he spotted a design flaw so massive it could have been a Cal-Tech marching band prank.

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