nuclear recoil

nuclear recoil

[′nü·klē·ər ′rē‚kȯil]
(nuclear physics)
The imparting of motion to an atomic nucleus during its emission of particles in radioactive decay, or during its collision with another particle, according to the principle of conservation of momentum.
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Thus for GeV WIMPs this average is in the keV regime, not high enough to excite the nucleus, but sufficient to measure the nuclear recoil energy.
This energy is 4 orders of magnitude smaller than the Xe nuclear recoil energy of around 25 keV for the 50 GeV WIMP.
Caption: Nuclear recoil Xenon dark matter experiments watch for dark matter interactions that cause xenon nuclei to recoil.
The nuclear recoil effect and emanation effect lead the generated radon atoms to diffuse from the rock lattice to connected micro-cracks and become free-state radon.
The nuclear recoil effect plays a key role in radon emanation.
Organic components labeled with U-238 radioactive decay products in Dictionema shales resulting from nuclear recoil processes // 5th Intern.
Their direct detection through nuclear recoil measurements after scattering off the target nuclei at the relevant dark matter experiments is of fundamental interest in modern physics and is expected to have a direct impact on astroparticle physics and cosmology.
Here we should take into account that only a small fraction of the nuclear recoil energy is used in the ionizing process.
Figure 2 depicts real events recorded with a prototype chamber used during the R&D of the WArP project: it can be seen as in particular integrated signals show the difference between the response produced, following an interaction by a fast, light particle (electron, left) and a nuclear recoil (right).
In the velocity integral, [v.sub.min]([E.sub.R]) is the minimum speed required for the incoming DM particle to cause a nuclear recoil with energy [E.sub.R].
Ions from nuclear recoils indeed have ranges with sub-[micro]m length; on the contrary the a emitter (inside the superheated liquid) can provide two sources of ionizations (the [alpha] itself with a track length of about 40 [micro]m for an energy of 5 MeV and the daughter nucleus.) In Figure 11 [23] such an effect is shown.

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