nuclear warhead


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nuclear warhead

[′nü·klē·ər ′wȯr‚hed]
(ordnance)
A warhead that contains fissionable or fissionable-fusionable material.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, India has recently completed its nuclear triad, which would require the production of more nuclear warheads and in effect churning out of more fissile material; naturally, the reactor grade plutonium available could be sourced out to meet this need.
Experts have predicted that the delivery vehicle for the North's first nuclear warhead would be the medium-range Rodong missile, rather than an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), which the North has yet to test.
The post North Korean leader says will soon test nuclear warhead (Video) appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
These missiles were armed with single nuclear warheads of 14 kilotons each, and were key to repelling an aggression.
Israel does not need 400 nuclear warheads to defend itself against non-nuclear neighbors.
IAEA chief Yukiya Amano expressed concern that Iran may have been trying to develop a nuclear warhead in his first report to the watchdog's board of governors on Thursday.
It's not known with certainty how many each country has, but both countries possess missiles capable of carrying both conventional and nuclear warheads.
All are decoys except for one nuclear warhead capable of catastrophic devastation.
That stolen nuclear warheads are at large is frightening enough, but what should really scare us is the possibility that the guys who designed and built the accident-prone, orbiting disaster that is the Mir space station might have also had input into the Russian nuclear programme.
One key effort modeled, in four separate stages, the crash of an airplane carrying a nuclear warhead.
Both sides are pledged to reduce their nuclear warhead counts from Cold War highs that topped 11,000 super bombs to only 6,000.
in Nampa, Idaho; Thornton paid about $1,700 for the stuff, much of which he's already sold off to farmers or melted down for scrap.) Possession of this equipment, then, puts Johansen (or anyone he might sell it to) well on his way to being able to build a nuclear warhead.

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