nuclear yield


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nuclear yield

[′nü·klē·ər ′yēld]
(nucleonics)
The energy released by the detonation of a nuclear weapon; measured in terms of megatons of trinitrotoluene (TNT) required to release the same energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
of pounds of nuclear yield) as permissible, and that Russia has
"No earth-burrowing missile can penetrate deep enough into the earth to contain an explosion with a nuclear yield even as small as 1 percent of the 15-kiloton Hiroshima weapon.
Department of Energy provides technical and scientific assistance to locate hidden nuclear material; to diagnose a suspected, improvised nuclear device; to plan the disablement of a nuclear yield or radiological dispersal device: and to advise local authorities on the hazards and effects.
In offering our full support to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, we advocated a ban on all nuclear-weapon test explosions, and all other nuclear explosions -- ie, all explosions with a nuclear yield, however small.
I have heard some critics of the treaty seek to cast doubt on whether Russia, in the negotiating and signing of the treaty, committed itself under treaty law to a truly comprehensive prohibition of any nuclear explosion, including an explosion or experiment or event of even the slightest nuclear yield. In other words, did Russia agree that hydronuclear experiments which do produce a nuclear yield, although usually very, very slight, would be banned and that hydrodynamic explosions, which have no yield because they do not reach criticality, would not be banned.
analysts believed that Russia was conducting hydronuclear tests, which produce a nuclear yield (as distinct from the yield of a weapon's chemical explosive) as low as pounds or even grams of TNT equivalent.
On the other hand, whether the availability of a wider range of nuclear yields will increase the likelihood of escalation is dependent not so much on military-technical factors as on political ones.
A copy of the classified document was obtained by the Los Angeles Times and later by the New York Times, which indicated that the review "argues that better earth-penetrating nuclear weapons with lower nuclear yields would be useful." It also said that "new earth-penetrating warheads...would be needed to attack targets that are buried deep underground."
Examples include control measures such as inherent features of warhead design that prevent accidental or unauthorized nuclear yields as well as operational procedures that prevent accidental or unauthorized use.
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