nudibranch


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nudibranch:

see sea slugsea slug,
name for a marine gastropod mollusk that lacks a shell as an adult and is usually brightly colored. Sea slugs, or nudibranchs, are distributed throughout the world, with the greatest numbers and the largest kinds found in tropical waters.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Burn is both an amateur seashore naturalist and internationally respected authority on nudibranchs and related molluscs--an encouraging example showing that anyone with sufficient interest and enthusiasm can make a valuable contribution to scientific knowledge.
The chemical defense of nudibranch mollusks: structure, biosynthetic origin and defensive properties of terpenoids from the dorid nudibranch Dendrodoris grandiflora.
Most conspicuous among these was the dramatic increase in intertidal density in northern California of the bright pink dorid nudibranch Okenia rosacea (Kraybill-Voth 2015; Stephens 2015).
The nudibranch group of molluscs achieve their brilliantly coloured surfaces from the pigments they ingest with their food.
Indeed, the rhinophores are considered a primary chemosensory organ in nudibranch mollusks (Alexander, 1970; Wedemeyer and Schild, 1995).
The simultaneous hermaphrodite nudibranch mollusk Aplysia with internal crossed fertilization, produces water-borne attractin pheromones in the oviduct and are released during egg laying (Cummins et al.
We're taken to a fascinating world and shown things I've never seen on any other wildlife documentary, like a snail attacking a starfish and a sea slug called a nudibranch eating an anemone.
While the message is important, it's the visual thrills that will most captivate audiences; the remarkable Frog Fish looking just like a sponge, an orange rag-like Nudibranch sucking down on a forest of tube anemone tentacles, the permanently enraged Humboldt squids and the elegantly feisty Mantis shrimp, the world's most powerful creature for its size, battling a marauding octopus.
nudibranch, pom-pom anemone, and predatory tunicate;
Knowledgeably co-authored by Nudibranch enthusiasts David W.