nuisance


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Related to nuisance: private nuisance, public nuisance

nuisance,

in law, an act that, without legal justification, interferes with safety, comfort, or the use of property. A private nuisance (e.g., erecting a wall that shuts off a neighbor's light) is one that affects one or a few persons, while a public nuisance (e.g., conducting a disorderly house) affects many persons. In some cases the victim of a private nuisance may abate it (e.g., tear down the wall). Damages are available to a party who suffers from a private nuisance or who is especially injured by a public nuisance, and courts will issue injunctions against continuing nuisances. Since public nuisances are injurious to the community, they may be prosecuted as crimes. Nuisance is a flexible legal category. Thus, while a slaughterhouse is lawful in a manufacturing district, it may be a nuisance in a residential quarter. Activities, such as operating blast furnaces, once deemed nuisances, are now recognized as indispensable and lawful.

nuisance

1. A public nuisance is said to exist in a building, structure, or premise: (a) if it is insufficiently cleaned, drained, lighted, or ventilated for the intended usage, (b) if it poses conditions detrimental to public health or dangerous to human life, and/or (c) if its air or water supplies are unwholesome.
2. A continuing legal wrong, usually committed by an owner or occupant of property on neighboring persons or property.

nuisance

Law something unauthorized that is obnoxious or injurious to the community at large (public nuisance) or to an individual, esp in relation to his ownership or occupation of property (private nuisance)
References in periodicals archive ?
Scottish Government Minister for Business, Innovation and Energy, Paul Wheelhouse said: Scotland is disproportionately affected by nuisance calls.
Said dilapidated buildings may be classified as a nuisance, which the Civil Code defines as among others, any property that: (a) injures or endangers the health or safety of others; (b) annoys or offends the senses; (c) obstructs or interferes with the free passage of any public highway or street, or any body of water; or (d) hinders or impairs the use of property.
PC Steve Nicholls, of Huddersfield Bike Team, said: "Nuisance bikes can cause distress and antisocial behaviour with noise nuisance as well as a danger to the public and their riders and we have seen a spike in the number of calls in recent weeks.
A borough council spokesman said: "Through various legislation the council has the power to investigate and resolve noise nuisance.
Part II discusses the origins of nuisance in the common law of England and its later application in early American common law.
5 per cent) of calls in Glasgow were classified as a nuisance, as were 47.
8billion nuisance calls a year, according to regulators Ofcom.
The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) received 170,000 concerns from those who had nuisance calls and texts over the past year.
The ICO received around 170,000 concerns in 2015 from people who've received nuisance calls and texts, a similar number to the previous year.
Throughout 2105, the ICO said it has fined companies making nuisance calls over a million pounds and expects to charge a similar amount in penalties in the early part of 2016.
In Stephane Castonguay and Vincent Bernard's article, "National and Local Definitions of an Environmental Nuisance," they examine the fundamental importance of water to both society and the economy in Quebec, and the difficult process of maintaining local access to clean water and the freedom of industry to develop along fresh waterways.
This notice should say what the nuisance is and will require that the nuisance be stopped or limited or require that specific works are carried out to prevent or lessen the nuisance.