nuisance

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nuisance,

in law, an act that, without legal justification, interferes with safety, comfort, or the use of property. A private nuisance (e.g., erecting a wall that shuts off a neighbor's light) is one that affects one or a few persons, while a public nuisance (e.g., conducting a disorderly house) affects many persons. In some cases the victim of a private nuisance may abate it (e.g., tear down the wall). Damages are available to a party who suffers from a private nuisance or who is especially injured by a public nuisance, and courts will issue injunctions against continuing nuisances. Since public nuisances are injurious to the community, they may be prosecuted as crimes. Nuisance is a flexible legal category. Thus, while a slaughterhouse is lawful in a manufacturing district, it may be a nuisance in a residential quarter. Activities, such as operating blast furnaces, once deemed nuisances, are now recognized as indispensable and lawful.

nuisance

1. A public nuisance is said to exist in a building, structure, or premise: (a) if it is insufficiently cleaned, drained, lighted, or ventilated for the intended usage, (b) if it poses conditions detrimental to public health or dangerous to human life, and/or (c) if its air or water supplies are unwholesome.
2. A continuing legal wrong, usually committed by an owner or occupant of property on neighboring persons or property.

nuisance

Law something unauthorized that is obnoxious or injurious to the community at large (public nuisance) or to an individual, esp in relation to his ownership or occupation of property (private nuisance)
References in periodicals archive ?
City data shows the nuisance ordinance might be having an effect, with a 42-percent reduction in public intoxication violations and a 60-percent reduction in disorderly conduct citations from 2017 to 2018, officials said.
However, the city council 7-1 voted Wednesday to make permanent the nuisance ordinance, which Cogley defended by saying it is narrowly tailored and targets behavior.
Said dilapidated buildings may be classified as a nuisance, which the Civil Code defines as among others, any property that: (a) injures or endangers the health or safety of others; (b) annoys or offends the senses; (c) obstructs or interferes with the free passage of any public highway or street, or any body of water; or (d) hinders or impairs the use of property.
Nuisance may likewise be classified as nuisance per se or nuisance per accidens.
Hamilton, Right-To-Farm Laws Reconsidered: Ten Reasons Why Legislative Efforts to Resolve Agricultural Nuisances May Be Ineffective, 3 Drake J.
The origins of agricultural nuisance can be traced back more than four hundred years to William Aldred's Case in 1610.
When delving into urban nuisances in Canada, the preceding articles have raised important questions regarding the liveability of cities.
Conceding the fact that your roosters are pets, any pets that constitute or create a nuisance cannot be kept."
More recently, plaintiffs have attempted to use public nuisance law in several recent cases to address climate change.
The prevailing legal process for abating public nuisances starts with inspection of dwellings and issuance of notices of violations to the parties responsible along with an order to comply with the statute or ordinance prohibiting the nuisance.
These grants provide financial assistance to municipalities and agencies of the state for aquatic nuisance species management programs.
Parts I-III introduce the legal issues involved in nuisance litigation against wind farms.