nulling interferometry

nulling interferometry

[¦nəl·iŋ ‚in·tə·fə′räm·ə·trē]
(optics)
A technique in which light waves from a bright object such as a star are made to interfere and cancel each other in an optical system, allowing the observation of much fainter nearby objects that would otherwise be invisible in the glare of the bright object.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas coronagraphy is the tried-and-true method for suppressing starlight, astronomers are developing a more intricate method called nulling interferometry.
Nulling interferometry will allow Hinz's team to study remnant dust disks around other stars like the solar-system dust that gives rise to the zodiacal light.
One option is to launch several small telescopes to fly in formation and perform nulling interferometry in the infrared.
To examine the dust disk encircling a young star 330 light-years away, scientists at the University of Arizona in Tucson used an emerging technique called nulling interferometry to block out the star's light.
Nulling interferometry should be an effective way to get rid of the overpowering starlight and reveal faint objects around it.
Ground-based observations using nulling interferometry first took place in 1997 at the Multiple Mirror Telescope on Mount Hopkins, Arizona, and within a few years the technique will be tested at the twin 8.
According to current plans, it may also use nulling interferometry to image Earth-size planets and maybe take their spectra.