nulling interferometry

nulling interferometry

[¦nəl·iŋ ‚in·tə·fə′räm·ə·trē]
(optics)
A technique in which light waves from a bright object such as a star are made to interfere and cancel each other in an optical system, allowing the observation of much fainter nearby objects that would otherwise be invisible in the glare of the bright object.
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To examine the dust disk encircling a young star 330 light-years away, scientists at the University of Arizona in Tucson used an emerging technique called nulling interferometry to block out the star's light.