number cruncher


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number cruncher

[′nəm·bər ‚krən·chər]
(computer science)
A computer with great power to carry out computations, designed to maximize this ability rather than to process large amounts of data.

number cruncher

A computer that is either specialized for or capable of high-speed calculations. See number crunching.
References in periodicals archive ?
When I assumed my first studio job as a production executive, experienced colleagues warned, "Don't let the number crunchers push you around.
While today's machines are amazingly fast number crunchers, many data-intensive applications are slowed because of the time it takes to simply access information from the memory chips.
So let's just hope that all those number crunchers whose jobs are disappearing because of sophisticated financial software agree.
Enter the chains' number crunchers, neither romantic nor necessarily interesting figures.
Unfortunately, today's most advanced number crunchers have neither the speed nor the storage capacity to handle more than a crude caricature of any given cosmic process.
We help our clients transition from Number Crunchers to Number Communicators , enabling them to improve professional satisfaction, perceived value and profits.
You would think that the number crunchers in Montrose would permit a rare moment of cheer in a workplace where staff are being asked repeatedly to suffer wage cuts and cut backs.
Police number crunchers have identified hotspot streets for registration plate crime across south Birmingham.
A group of 17-year-olds have been shown how number crunchers are vital to the workplace and are currently in high demand by employers.
The bank's number crunchers have estimated how much students in the city, mainly studying at Coventry and Warwick universities, will spend over the year.
The booming real estate industry has had a knock-on effect on the traditional role of the accounting industry--and the number crunchers are beginning to feel the pressure, according to some.
The moss-covered plan to overhaul the New York Times' arts and cultural coverage has finally headed upstairs for the paper's number crunchers to mull.