nunnery

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Related to nunneries: convent

nunnery

the convent or religious house of a community of nuns
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

nunnery

A convent for females.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The combination of Strocchia's scholarship and engaging narrative sets a new standard for future studies of nunneries in other Italian cities.
Four days earlier, nuns belonging to his nunneries staged protests against China's compulsory "patriotic education" campaign in the region.
These nuns are scattered in various nunneries, according to the study of Dr.Tashi Zangmo, there are only 22 nunneries.
This book puts the abbesses and prioresses of medieval English nunneries at the centre of investigation.
The Dalai Lama: Up to now, most of the abbots in the nunneries are males.
The Vikings tore through the northernmost three kingdoms, conquering, raping, looting and pillaging, saving particular savagery for monasteries and nunneries, until they reached Wessex, the wealthiest, southernmost kingdom, governed by a young king, Alfred.
During the next 200 years, several other buildings were constructed, and by the mid-1500s there were 24 in total--hermitages and nunneries as well as monasteries.
Simons in contrast places beguines squarely within their social, political, and ecclesiastical context, refusing to simplify their history into a response either to a shortage of available husbands or to a shortage of spaces in traditional nunneries. As he argues throughout, beguines have to be understood in terms of religion, of the urban economy, and of gender.
Only in the last decade, studies by Robert Kendrick, Craig Monson, and Kimberlyn Montford--dealing respectively with nunneries in Milan, Bologna, and Rome--have opened up a fertile field of inquiry, contributing to a greater understanding of the role of women as musicians during the Catholic Reform.
On ordaining, nuns are often left to fend for themselves-to follow their vows without training in how to do so; to work as domestic servants in family homes due to a lack of nunneries; or to live at nunneries whose raison d'etre was to grow food and weave robes for monks, feed visitors travelling to monasteries, and work in the monastic kitchens.
Within this misogynistic context the mocking use of 'nunnery' would fit as a bitter reference, drawn from anti-Catholic propaganda directed against nunneries, to vice parading as virtue.(9)