nutmeg

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nutmeg,

name applied to members of the family Myristicaceae. The true nutmeg (Myristica fragrans) is an evergreen tree native to the Moluccas but now cultivated elsewhere in the tropics and to a limited extent in S Florida. The fruit is the source of two spices of commercial value: whole or ground nutmeg, from the inner seed; and mace, from the fibrous aril (seed covering) that separates the seed from its thick outer husk. It also supplies butters and an essential oil used in medicines, toilet preparations, and dentifrices. Other trees of the Myristica genus, also called nutmegs, are of a limited use commercially. Several species of the tropical American genus Virola are valuable for timber (e.g., V. surinamensis) and the red resinous sap of some others is boiled down, powdered, and made into a hallucinogenic snuff by some Amazonian indigenous peoples. Connecticut is called the Nutmeg State. Nutmeg is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Magnoliales, family Myristicaceae.

Bibliography

See G. Milton, Nathaniel's Nutmeg (1999).

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nutmeg

nutmeg

Common spice considered to be an aphrodisiac in many cultures. Source of myrisiticin, a mild central nervous system stimulant and euphoric. Some people grind down a nut for fresh nutmeg and take it as a way to get high. Be aware large doses are poisonous and can cause miscarriage. As an intoxicant, can lead to hallucinations, delirium and days of nausea and headaches. Used as an anti-parasitic. A small amount of nutmeg, about the size of a pea, can be taken once daily for a year to relieve chronic nervous problems, as well as heart problems stemming from poor circulation.

nutmeg

[′nət‚meg]
(botany)
Myristica fragrans. A dark-leafed evergreen tree of the family Myristicaceae cultivated for the golden-yellow fruits which resemble apricots; a delicately flavored spice is obtained from the kernels inside the seeds.

nutmeg

1. an East Indian evergreen tree, Myristica fragrans, cultivated in the tropics for its hard aromatic seed: family Myristicaceae
2. the seed of this tree, used as a spice
3. any of several similar trees or their fruit
4. a greyish-brown colour

nutmeg

1. an East Indian evergreen tree, Myristica fragrans, cultivated in the tropics for its hard aromatic seed: family Myristicaceae
2. any of several similar trees or their fruit
References in classic literature ?
The nutmeg, with which they are in the habit of stuffing their crops, flavours their flesh and renders it delicious eating.
These things were crowded with utensils of all sorts: frying pans, sauce pans, kettles, forks, knives, basting and soup spoons, nutmeg graters, sifters, colanders, meat saws, flat irons, rolling pins and many other things of a like nature.
Something in his face made Polly feel a little guilty, so she fell to grating nutmeg, with a vigor which made red cheeks the most natural thing in life.
Bishop said that when he was a young man, and had fallen for a brief space into the habit of writing sermons on Saturdays, a habit which all young sons of the church should sedulously avoid, he had frequently been sensible of a depression, arising as he supposed from an over- taxed intellect, upon which the yolk of a new-laid egg, beaten up by the good woman in whose house he at that time lodged, with a glass of sound sherry, nutmeg, and powdered sugar acted like a charm.
At length the procession was dissolved by the violent arrival of a nutmeg, before which the drawing-room door bounced open as if it were a cannon-ball; and while that fragrant article, dispersed through several glasses of coloured warm water, was going the round of society, Miss Podsnap returned to her seat by her new friend.
When in better circumstances, owns to having been in the constant habit of drinking ale and beer; says he is not certain whether he did not twice a week, for twenty years, taste "dog's nose," which your committee find upon inquiry, to be compounded of warm porter, moist sugar, gin, and nutmeg (a groan, and 'So it is
By collecting nutmegs, a loyalty scheme based around referrals and pounds invested, users can reduce their management fees to as low as 0.
Performing a nutmeg is commonly seen as showing the opponent is lacking in footballing skill, and therefore amongst amateur players (particularly children), nutmegs are frequently tried so as to embarrass the opposition player and prove your own skill.
He was referring to the decision by W&W Spices to recruit the GCNA's top technician and its stated intention to buy farmers' land and purchase nutmegs directly from them at higher prices.
W&W Spices announced plans to process and market a range of secondary products derived from nutmegs for export to established food beverage and pharmaceuticals markets in the U.