agar

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Related to nutrient agar: blood agar, MacConkey agar

Agar

(ā`gər), the same as HagarHagar
or Agar
, according to the Book of Genesis, servant of Abraham's wife Sarah and mother of his eldest son, Ishmael. She and her son were sent out into the wilderness because of Sarah's jealousy. An angel aided her there.
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agar

(ä`gär, ā`–, ăg`är), product obtained from several species of red algae, or seaweedseaweed,
name commonly used for the multicellular marine algae. Simpler forms, consisting of one cell (e.g., the diatom) or of a few cells, are not generally called seaweeds; these tiny plants help to make up plankton.
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, chiefly from the Ceylon, or Jaffna, moss (Gracilaria lichenoides) and species of Gelidium, harvested in eastern Asia and California. Chemically, agar is a polymer made up of subunits of the sugar galactose; it is a component of the algae's cell walls. Dissolved in boiling water and cooled, agar becomes gelatinous; its chief uses are as a culture medium (particularly for bacteria) and as a laxative, but it serves also as a thickening for soups and sauces, in jellies and ice cream, in cosmetics, for clarifying beverages, and for sizing fabrics. See also RhodophytaRhodophyta
, phylum (division) of the kingdom Protista consisting of the photosynthetic organisms commonly known as red algae. Most of the world's seaweeds belong to this group.
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Agar

A major constituent of the cell walls of certain red algae, especially members of the families Gelidiaceae and Gracilariaceae. Extracted for its gelling properties, it is one of three algal polysaccharides of major economic importance, the others being alginate and carrageenan. Agar is composed of two similar fractions, agarose and agaropectin, in which the basic unit is galactose, linked alternately α-1,3-( d -galactose) and β-1,4-(α- l -galactose).

Agar is prepared by boiling the algae in water, after which the filtered solution is cooled, purified, and dried. It is an amorphous, translucent material that is packaged in granules, flakes, bricks, or sheets. One of its chief uses is as a gelling agent in media for culturing microorganisms. It is also used in making confections, as an emulsifier in cosmetics and food products, as a sizing agent, as an inert carrier of drugs in medicine, and as a laxative. See Culture

agar

[′äg·ər]
(materials)
A gelatinous product extracted from certain red algae and used chiefly as a gelling agent in culture media.

agar

a complex gelatinous carbohydrate obtained from seaweeds, esp those of the genus Gelidium, used as a culture medium for bacteria, a laxative, in food such as ice cream as a thickening agent (E406), etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In all, 30 representative microorganisms were isolated on nutrient agar amended with glucose (1 %), purified and maintained as pure cultures.
Isolates from nutrient agar and Potassium tellurite agar is confirmed as Corynebacterium renale on basis of cultural, morphological and biochemical characters these results are in agreement with Barrow and Felthem (1993).
Effect of NaCl on bacterial growth was tested on both nutrient agar medium and nutrient broth.
Resistant strains were first inoculated on nutrient agar media and were incubated at 371C for 24 h.
Refreshed culture of each isolate (30 ml) in nutrient broth was mixed with 70 ml of nutrient agar and poured into plates.
A total 13 indigenous bacterial strains were recovered from water samples on nutrient agar supplemented with 100 mg/l concentration of lead acetate trihydrate by the standard pour plate method.
Potato dextrose agar and nutrient agar were prepared according to the standard method.
Gram stain was done from nutrient agar and it showed that Gram-positive cocci characteristically larger, oval arranged in pair, and short chain in pair were arranged at an angle to each other.
1 ml of the gel was introduced into the 7 mm holes bored into the nutrient agar media inoculated with the selected urinary pathogens and incubated at 37degC for 24 hours.
Single colony of Klebsiella Pneumoniae grown on nutrient agar for (18-24) hrs.
The samples were serially diluted in sterile saline water and the dilutions (104 and 105) were plated in nutrient agar plates and incubated at 37degC for 48 h.
Nutrient Agar, Blood Agar and Chocolate Agar, for the isolation of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.