nutrient foramen


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nutrient foramen

[′nü·trē·ənt fə′rā·mən]
(anatomy)
The opening into the canal which gives passage to the blood vessels of the medullary cavity of a bone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The present study gains clinical significance as the anatomy of the nutrient foramen especially its consistent location and the large size becomes important because fractures involving upper third of tibia through the nutrient canal which disturbs the blood supply to the shaft.
Position of the nutrient foramen on the shafts of human long bones.
The mean distance between the following tibial morphometric parameters: (i) Intercondylar tubercles (male: 12.66 mm; female: 11.23 mm); (ii) Medial and lateral condyles (male: 73.47 mm; female: 66.53 mm); (iii) Inferior articular surface and tip of medial malleolus (male: 15.05 mm; female: 14.00 mm); (iv) Medial border and interrosseous crest (male: 26.18 mm; female: 22.91 mm); (v) Anterior border and posterior surface at middle of bone (male: 30.68 mm; female: 27.95 mm); (vi) Anterior border and posterior surface at level of nutrient foramen (male: 34.03 mm; female: 30.58 mm); (vii) Lateral condyle and tip of medial malleolus (male: 382.51 mm; female: 367.09 mm); (viii) Interrosseous crest and point where soleal line ends (male: 24.31 mm; female: 21.76 mm) (Table III).
Statistically significant differences were found between males and females in the following tibial morphometric parameters: i) Distance between intercondylar tubercles; ii) distance between medial and lateral condyles; iii) distance between inferior articular surface and tip of medial malleolus; iv) distance between medial border and interrosseous crest; v) distance between anterior border and posterior surface at middle of bone; vi) distance between anterior border and posterior surface at level of nutrient foramen; vii) distance between interrosseous crest and point where soleal line ends; viii) maximum circumference of shaft (Table III).
Thus, the areas where nutrient foramen is located must be, whenever possible, avoided during surgery.
We described the relation of nutrient foramen to linea aspera in our study###Gumusburun described the total number of nutrient foramina on the long bones but
Each femur was observed by using a magnifying lens for nutrient foramen on the shaft.
A considerable interest in studying nutrient foramen resulted not only from morphological, but also from clinical aspects.
The present investigation is planned to study the location, number, and direction of the nutrient foramen in long bones of adult forearm, i.e.
Although, the presence of double and six nutrient foramina were identified, a single nutrient foramen appeared to be most prevalent in the present study (Table I).