nux vomica


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nux vomica

(nŭks vŏm`əkə), bitter-tasting drug obtained from the poisonous seeds of Strychnos nux-vomica, a tree that grows in Sri Lanka, India, and N Australia. The dried seeds contain strychninestrychnine
, bitter alkaloid drug derived from the seeds of a tree, Strychnos nux-vomica, native to Sri Lanka, Australia, and India. It has been used as a rat poison for five centuries, and rat biscuits still remain a cause of accidental poisoning in humans.
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 and brucine, both colorless crystalline alkaloids, as well as sugar, acid, and oil. In the past nux vomica was used as a tonic in the form of a tincture, or alcoholic solution, but it is not used in modern medicine. In minute quantities it has a powerful peristaltic action on the intestines and in larger doses causes convulsions and death.

Nux Vomica

 

(Strychnos nux-vomica), also strychnine tree a small tree (to 15 m high) of the family Loganiaceae. The leaves are opposite, leathery, and shiny. The small greenish white flowers are gathered into umbellate cymose inflorescences. The fruit is a berry, with two to eight very hard disk-shaped seeds with shiny, silky hairs.

The nux vomica is native to the tropical forests of Asia and northern Australia; it is cultivated in the tropics of Africa. Like several other closely related species, it contains poisonous alkaloids (strychnine, brucine), mainly in the seeds. Strychnine (nitrate) and galenicals (the dried extract and tincture of nux vomica) are used in medicine and veterinary medicine as tonics to treat lowered metabolism, rapid fatigability, hypotension, weakened cardiac activity (resulting from intoxication and infection), pareses and paralyses, and atony of the stomach. The genus Strychnos contains 150 to 200 species, which are common to the tropics of both hemispheres. Some species are used as a source of the arrow poison curare, which contains alkaloids called curarines; others are used to treat snakebites and to purify drinking water. [29–592.–1]

nux vomica

[′nəks ′väm·ə·kə]
(botany)
The seed of Strychnos nux-vomica, an Indian tree of the family Loganiaceae; contains the alkaloid strychnine, and was formerly used in medicine.

nux vomica

a medicine manufactured from the seeds of this tree, formerly used as a heart stimulant

nux vomica

1. an Indian spiny loganiaceous tree, Strychnos nux-vomica, with orange-red berries containing poisonous seeds
2. any of the seeds of this tree, which contain strychnine and other poisonous alkaloids

Nyasa

, Nyassa
Lake. a lake in central Africa at the S end of the Great Rift Valley: the third largest lake in Africa, drained by the Shire River into the Zambezi. Area: about 28 500 sq. km (11 000 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
El Cuadro 1 presenta la distribucion porcentual de la evolucion del proceso diarreico de los lechones segun el tratamiento empleado, sin que se haya encontrado diferencias significativas entre tratamientos; de alli que los resultados demuestran una similar efectividad con el uso de Nux vomica y de TratHo[R] colera, en comparacion con el uso de antibioticos en el tratamiento de la diarrea del lechon.
La nux vomica puede ser utilizada en el manejo de nauseas y vomito, sirve tambien en el manejo de la constipacion, sinusitis y como coadyuvante en el manejo de la ansiedad e irritabilidad de las personas.
nux vomica seeds were purchased from the Ayurvedic Pharmacy, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University.
A good example is nux vomica Consumed in large quantities, vomica can cause nausea (it's a seed from the Strychnos nux-vomica tree that contains strychnine).
She also recommends arnica for bruises, belladonna for a headache, calendula for cuts, lavender oil to add to a bath to aid sleep and distress, and nux vomica for hangovers.
Commonly used remedies include arnica for bruises, milk thistle for hangovers and nux vomica for anyone who has over-indulged on food and alcohol.
Made from the dried seeds of the strychnos nux vomica plant, it can be used to treat anxiety; burn-out; colic; constipation; cystitis; digestive upsets related to over- indulgence and high stress levels; haemorrhoids; hangover headaches; head colds; labour pains; muscle tension; painful periods; poor sleep; tension headaches and stress-related migraines.
If this is the case, thehomeo-pathic remedy Nux Vomica 30c may be of assistance.
Alternatively, homeopathic remedies that are safe to take include Tabacum 6c every 15 minutes for up to 10 doses; or Nux Vomica 6c every 15 minutes for up to 10 doses.
Homeopathy: The homeopathic remedy Nux Vomica (seeds of the Poison Nut evergreen tree) will also help to relieve motion sickness.
In the case of holiday stomach upsets, Elaine would suggest arsenicum for food poisoning conditions in which patients feel cold and clammy or nux vomica for those feeling the after effects of overindulgence in rich food and too much drink.