oat

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oat

1. an erect annual grass, Avena sativa, grown in temperate regions for its edible seed
2. the seeds or fruits of this grass
3. any of various other grasses of the genus Avena, such as the wild oat
4. Poetic Music a flute made from an oat straw

oat

[ōt]
(botany)
Any plant of the genus Avena in the family Graminae, cultivated as an agricultural crop for its seed, a cereal grain, and for straw.
References in periodicals archive ?
A positive quadratic effect was observed for the variables EE and NFC intake (Table 2), and the highest mean values recorded were 21.07 and 450.53g, respectively, obtained for the diet with 7.5% coffee husk inclusion; a decrease in the intake of these nutrients was observed for the diets with 15 and 22.5% coffee husk in replacement of oat hay. Thus, inclusion of coffee husk at up to 7.5% of the total DM of the diet resulted in increased nutrient intake without affecting DM intake.
For each unit of oat hay replaced by coffee husk, there were increases in NDF intake, ADF intake, and NDF digestibility of 3.08, 1.05, and 0.57%, respectively.
There is great variation in oat hay yield and nutritive value of cereal forages depending on stage of plant growth that beasts for harvest (Lloyed, 1961).
Nutritive value of oat hay such as total digestible nutrient, protein, fat, minerals and vitamin is high and appropriate.
Oat hay supplementation balanced the nitrogen content in diet, which could significantly increase nitrogen deposition of calves [27].
Replacing alfalfa hay with oat hay diluted dietary protein content and led to increased protein digestion, BW gain, and less environmental nitrogen output.
The chemical composition (% DM basis) of concentrate mixture, LMM, oat hay and wheat straw offered to lambs for a period of 6 months and during metabolism trial is presented in the Table 1.
However, concentrate, wheat straw, oat hay and total roughage intake (g/d) did not differ significantly (p>0.05) irrespective of dietary treatments.
Oat hay harvested when the plant is more mature and only a small amount of grain remains in the forage has the nutritional value of straw, therefore limiting use in horse feeding programs.
"The energy and protein content of good oat hay make it a suitable forage for mature horses at maintenance and early gestating mares," Coleman said.
Where, [Y.sub.ij] = in vitro C[H.sub.4] production at 24 h, [mu] = overall mean, [T.sub.i] = fixed effect of the ith treatment with [sub.i] = oat hay at 600, 800, and 1,000 mg inclusion; Cueramo at 600, 800, and 1,000 mg inclusion; ...
CP from the four FTS was higher than the reference feed (oat hay), and varied from 88 g/kg DM in Granadillo to 167 g/kg DM in Cueramo.