object language


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object language

[′äb·jekt ‚laŋ·gwij]
(computer science)
The intended and desired output language in the translation or conversion of information from one language to another.

object language

(1) A programming language that is object oriented. See object-oriented programming.

(2) A language defined by another language. See metalanguage.

(3) The output of a compiler or assembler program. See machine language.
References in periodicals archive ?
One is not able to express this fact in the object language but only in an extension containing classical negation.
In RRG terms, primary object languages permit only the marked linking possibility in terms of the AUH.
In Chapter 3, we encounter the first of the new object languages.
Let "[Alpha]" and "[Beta]" be metalinguistic variables ranging over object language individual constants, "[Psi]" and "[Psi]" be metalinguistic variables ranging over object language unary predicates, and "[Chi]" be a metalinguistic variable ranging over object language binary predicates.
Against the background of this claim, one is at least allowed to voice a doubt as to whether it is appropriate to devote a fifth of the book to a polemic that, in common with most generative grammar, uses English as its object language (that is, it does nothing to increase students' appreciation of the German language), and for many undergraduates may well be so arcane as to leave them cold.
Now, the aboutness relation holds between an object language and its objects.
Donald Davidson has claimed that a theory of meaning identifies the logical constants of the object language by treating them in the phrasal axioms of the theory, and that the theory entails a relation of logical consequence among the sentences of the object language.
Since his book is organized around a systematic presentation of the subject, Broadie treats medieval logic in a series of thematic chapters devoted to the object language of medieval logic and the parts of logical discourse: terms, propositions, and inferences.