objective probabilities


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objective probabilities

[əb′jek·tiv ‚präb·ə′bil·əd·ēz]
(statistics)
Probabilities determined by the long-run relative frequency of an event. Also known as frequency probabilities.
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So much so that objective probabilities can be evaluated via measurements of the corresponding frequencies, which are objective properties of ensembles.
Application to Knightian/Misesian framework: Needless to restate the well-known objections to objective probabilities (e.g., cf.
We hypothesize that high-risk persons, based on their objective probabilities of an accident and actual accident histories, possess more private information about their actual riskiness than others.
As Wilkinson 1 points out, the objective probabilities do not apply to the research hypotheses because these have no associated population to which an objective probability can be applied.
The second is whether prior beliefs regarding policy success influence a person's support for mitigation policy when objective probabilities of policy success are presented.
Kerr's most egregious error, however, is a different one: his assumption that the probable cause inquiry inherently involves an assessment of objective probabilities. It does not.
Savage (1954)--building on that of von Neumann and Morgenstern (1944)--presented, to me among many others, a convincing axiomatic argument that, in acting under uncertainty, one should maximize expected utility using probability beliefs where objective probabilities are not know.
To the extent that the betting public acquire race-specific information to inform their assessment of the true chances of individual runners, the actual degree of bias will depart from this limiting case, and the proportions bet will approach more closely the distribution of objective probabilities. The degree of bias is therefore largely a function of the amount of information available to bettors and the number of runners in the race.
Most of the "critics" classical approach to probability of generating risk-generating events have turned against "objectivity": In tests conducted studies and also appeared many argue that is not a random phenomenon a phenomenon that can be measured using objective probabilities. In any phenomenon considered to occur randomly we always find a number of factors which determine to a certain extent the evolution of this phenomenon.
Neither type of probability is necessarily more correct than the other when used to make a decision, but objective probabilities generally give more confidence.
Objective probabilities are those that are known with some certainty, based on experience, experiments, or results of research or study with large samples.