oblique


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Related to oblique: oblique angle, isometric

oblique

1. Geometry
a. (of lines, planes, etc.) neither perpendicular nor parallel to one another or to another line, plane, etc.
b. not related to or containing a right angle
2. Biology having asymmetrical sides or planes
3. (of a map projection) constituting a type of zenithal projection in which the plane of projection is tangential to the earth's surface at some point between the equator and the poles
4. Navigation the act of changing course by less than 90?
5. an aerial photograph taken at an oblique angle

oblique

[ə′blēk]
(anatomy)
Referring to a muscle, positioned obliquely and having one end that is not attached to bone.
(botany)
Referring to a leaf, having the two sides of a blade unequal.
(science and technology)
Having a slanted direction or position.
References in classic literature ?
The even tone has two variations differing from each other only in pitch; the oblique tone has three variations, known as "Rising, Sinking, and Entering.
By this oblique motion, the island is conveyed to different parts of the monarch's dominions.
He was clinging to the oblique stem of a palm-tree.
I recognized by the oblique feet that it was some extinct creature after the fashion of the Megatherium.
The Victoria was then taking an oblique line to the westward.
The first party consisted of Pfuel and his adherents- military theorists who believed in a science of war with immutable laws- laws of oblique movements, outflankings, and so forth.
But the projectile was perceptibly nearing the moon, and evidently succumbed to her influence to a certain degree; though its own velocity also drew it in an oblique direction.
Tenders are invited for Special Repair To Bldg No P 22 Or Md Accn In 28 Oblique 1 Camp And Bldg No T 10 In 25 Oblique 4 Camp At Yol Cantt
Nearmap has launched a national survey program providing true, high-resolution oblique imagery and derivative 3-D products.
The plurality of this oblique noun is precisely what interferes in the agreement relation and finally "illegally attracts [plural] agreement on the verb" (Acuna-Farina 2009, 392), with the subsequent subject-verb disagreement and the ungrammatical outcome.
The President's reference to the slaughter was an oblique deflection of the way he has been pictured as a mass murderer, a Hitler, which is a label that he rejects,' said Abella.
In the female larynx, it was present unilaterally on the left oblique line of thyroid lamina.