oblique pole

oblique pole

[ə′blēk ′pōl]
(mapping)
One of the two points 90° from an oblique equator.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The full vehicle study conducted in this research, with different vehicle architectures (body-on-frame and unitized), body styles, test conditions (oblique pole side impact, IIHS side MDB, and FMVSS 214 MDB), and simulation methods (CV/UP, CPM, ALE) was too extensive to be included in this paper.
The first three tests, including an oblique pole side impact, a IIHS side MDB, and a LINCAP test, were utilized in the development of simulation methodology for pressure sensor prediction in full vehicle tests while the fourth test, a FMVSS 214 test, was adopted to predict the pressure sensor response directly and validate the developed simulation methodology.
Three side impact modes, oblique pole side impact, IIHS side MDB, and FMVSS 214 MDB, were investigated in this study.
Oblique Pole Side Impact--Vehicle A (10 MPH/4.47 mm/ms)
The vehicle chosen for the oblique pole side impact condition was vehicle A with FWD, a 2.0L EcoBoost engine, and a SID-IIs.
The vehicle impacted the oblique pole on the passenger side in the physical test.
Due to higher impact speed at 31 mph [13.86 mm/ms], the first pressure peak, around 1.18 bar, obtained from this test is higher than that of the oblique pole test (about 1.1 bar) discussed previously.
Comparing the air leakage (Figures 34f to 34m) obtained from this simulation with those of the oblique pole (Figure 32d) and IIHS side MDB (Figure 33e to 33l), it can be seen clearly that the air leakage for the LINCAP test is the most severe one among the three test conditions.
Table 4 summarizes the finite element model size needed to represent the air and structures, numerical stability, prediction accuracy, and computational time required for the three full vehicle side impact modes, including the oblique pole, IIHS side MDB, and FMVSS 214.
In this study, the IIHS side impact simulations took longer time to complete than those of the oblique pole and LINCAP simulations.
However, 20 mph lateral oblique pole tests have more recently been conducted as part of the New Car Assessment Program (NCAP).
The first reason is that the axial split magnetic pole is equivalent to the oblique pole, and the air gap flux density waveform is improved; the other reason is that the sectional pole blocked the formation of eddy current loop, so the permanent magnetic eddy current loss decreased with the increased of number of segments.

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