oblique shock


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oblique shock

[ə′blēk ′shäk]
(fluid mechanics)

inclined shock

inclined shock
inclined shock
When ball is in the center, it means that the aircraft is level. If the aircraft is inclined to either side, the ball will be not be in the center anymore.
A shock wave that forms on a sharp-pointed object moving through the air at a speed greater than the speed of sound. Air passing through an inclined shock wave is slowed down, but if the wave angle is less than about 70° it still will be supersonic. The area bounded by the sides of an oblique shock wave forms the Mach cone. Also known as an oblique shock.

oblique shock wave

oblique shock wave
A shock wave that forms on a sharp-pointed object moving through the air at a speed greater than the speed of sound. Air passing through an oblique shock wave is slowed down but if the wave angle is less than about 70°, it still will be supersonic. The area bounded by the sides of an oblique shock wave forms the Mach cone. Also known as an oblique shock. See also Mach cone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Readers should have background in basic shock wave concepts, including the equations for an oblique shock in a steady flow of a perfect gas.
Subsequent chapters address steady one-dimensional flow, normal shock waves, oblique shock and expansion waves, compressible flow equations, similarity rule, and two-dimensional compressible flows, among other topics, ending with chapters on ramjet, and jets.
If the exit pressure is slightly less than the back pressure, then oblique shock waves occur at the nozzle exit as shown in figure 2.