oblique wing


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oblique wing

oblique wing
A wing that pivots at its midpoint as a single unit, so that one half is swept back and the other half is swept forward. Also called a slew wing.
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Jones believed that an oblique wing supersonic transport aircraft might achieve twice the fuel economy of an airplane with conventional wings.
Jones considered the oblique wing a viable concept after the flight testing, but the aviation industry was cool to the idea, perhaps because of the AD-1's poor flying qualities.
Such size, range and loiter time, and fuel load, as well as the wide range of speeds offered by oblique wing geometry, have made it attractive for dual-use missions, such as aerial refueling and an airborne platform for sensors and C2 apparatus.
Between 1952 and the present, NASA has conducted numerous studies on the oblique wing designs, including a passenger OAW design that could carry more than 300 passengers distances of 6,000 miles at speeds up to 1.
Stanford researchers now have designed, built and successfully flown a sophisticated 20-foot remote-controlled model of the oblique wing.
Before the researchers flew their oblique wing model they tested it extensively by mounting it on the top of a moving car.
2) NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's AD-1 oblique wing research jet is shown in 1980 with its wing at a 60-degree angle.
McMurtry made the first flights in NASA's F-8 supercritical wing project and the AD-1 oblique wing airplane.
McMurtry, director of flight operations at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, made the first flights in NASA's F-8 supercritical wing project and the AD-1 oblique wing airplane.
McMurtry made the first flights of the F-8 supercritical wing project and the AD-1 oblique wing airplane.
Kincheloe Award for his work with the AD-1 oblique wing in 1982.