phlebitis

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phlebitis

phlebitis (fləbīˈtĭs), inflammation of a vein. Phlebitis is almost always accompanied by a blood clot, or thrombus, in the affected vein, a condition known as thrombophlebitis (see thrombosis). Blood-clot formation may follow injury or be associated with infections. Thrombophlebitis of deep veins, usually in the legs or pelvis, may occur in patients recovering from childbirth, surgery, or other conditions requiring prolonged bedrest; the clotting mechanism is thought to be impaired when the legs are immobilized. Pregnancy or the use of oral contraceptives predisposes some women to thrombophlebitis. The major danger is that a clot originating in the leg vein may dislodge and travel to the lung, a condition known as pulmonary embolism (see embolus). To avoid the risk of embolism, thrombophlebitis is usually treated with anticoagulants.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Phlebitis

 

an inflammation of a venous wall caused by an infection or by the introduction of an irritating agent into the vein (aseptic phlebitis). Thrombophlebitis results from the additional presence of thrombosis. Phlebitis occurs most commonly in the veins of the pelvis and in the superficial and deep veins of the extremities. Phlebitis of the portal vein, or pylephlebitis, is usually a complication of an inflammatory or purulent process in the abdominal cavity. Phlebitis may result in sclerosis of the vein. In the treatment of varicose veins aseptic phlebitis is sometimes induced artificially by injecting an irritant into the lumen of a vein for the purpose of obliterating the lumen.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

phlebitis

[flə·bīd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of a vein.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

phlebitis

inflammation of a vein
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(b) High-power magnification shows obliterative phlebitis and numerous lymphocytes and plasma cells in the background.
(115) Obliterative phlebitis, which is one of the main features of IgG4-RD, is only seen in RT and not in HT.
The presence of storiform fibrosis and a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate is highly suggestive of IgG4-related disease; however, obliterative phlebitis is seldom identified on a needle biopsy.
Although foci of phlebitis are identified, obliterative phlebitis is not seen.
(31) As with other manifestations of IgG4-related disease, the diagnosis rests on a triumvirate of histologic features: (1) a dense, lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with storiform-type fibrosis; (2) obliterative phlebitis; and (3) elevated numbers of Ig[G4.sup.+] plasma cells, as well as an elevated IgG4 to IgG ratio.
Obliterative phlebitis typically involves veins within the outer portion of the bile duct.
The right coronary artery (RCA) displayed a tumorous lesion consisting of severe inflammation and thickening of the adventitia with obliterative phlebitis of venous branches, sclerosing inflammation of the media, and an increased infiltrate of IgG4-positive plasma cells by immunohistochemistry.
Proposed characteristic morphologic features include an increased number of IgG4-positive plasma cells (more than 50/HPF), an increase in the ratio of IgG4:IgG plasma cells of greater than 40%, and obliterative phlebitis. (7-9,21-23) There is often an associated eosinophilic and lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate.
No obliterative phlebitis was seen in our case, but the incidence of this finding is known to vary tremendously among different organ systems; one large study identifies its presence in 56% to 85% of diagnosed cases depending on the system involved.
Histologic features were initially described in cases of autoimmune pancreatitis and include (1) dense fibrosis with an associated mixed inflammatory infiltrate with IgG4-positive plasma cells, (2) infiltration or granulomas in some cases, and (3) obliterative phlebitis. Subsequent reports (1-4) have shown similar features at sites of extrapancreatic involvement.
In addition to elevated numbers of plasma cells, all cases showed easily identifiable obliterative phlebitis on Verhoeff-van Gieson elastic tissue stain.