oboe


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oboe

(ō`bō, ō`boi) [Ital., from Fr. hautbois] or

hautboy

(ō`boi, hō`–), woodwind instrument of conical bore, its mouthpiece having a double reed. The instruments possessing these general characteristics may be referred to as the oboe family, which includes the English hornEnglish horn,
musical instrument, the alto of the oboe family, pitched a fifth lower than the oboe and treated as a transposing instrument. It has a pear-shaped bell, giving it a soft, melancholy tone.
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, the bassoonbassoon
, double-reed woodwind instrument that plays in the bass and tenor registers. Its 8-ft (2.4-m) conical tube is bent double, the instrument thus being about 4 ft (1.2 m) high. It evolved from earlier double-reed instruments in the 16th cent.
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, and the contrabassooncontrabassoon,
large, deep-toned instrument of the oboe family, also called double bassoon. Its tube, over 16 ft (5 m) long, is doubled upon itself four times. It was first made by Hans Schreiber of Berlin in 1620.
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 or double bassoon. The oboe was developed in the mid-17th cent. in France from various older double-reed instruments, which the oboe, with its greater expressive and dynamic range, largely displaced by the 18th cent. It was soon used in the orchestra, possibly as early as 1657, and was the principal orchestral woodwind throughout most of the 18th cent., the flute and clarinet gaining an equal footing only late in the century. It was also a favorite solo instrument, and it has an extensive solo and chamber-music literature from the baroque and early classical periods. In the 19th cent., although retaining its importance in the orchestra, it was rarely employed for solo purposes. In the 20th cent. its solo use increased. It was gradually improved mechanically, notably in the 19th cent., and the Conservatory model, developed in France, is most used now. The oboe d'amore, pitched a minor third lower than the oboe, was much used in the baroque era, especially by J. S. Bach. It fell into disuse thereafter, but was revived in the 20th cent. Its tone is less brilliant than that of the oboe. The oboe da caccia is an early version of the English horn, pitched a fifth lower than the oboe and therefore a transposing instrument. Oboes of this size were known by 1665, and Purcell scored for one in his Dioclesian (1691). A curved form, often with the present instrument's characteristic bulbous bell, appeared in the 18th cent. and was employed occasionally by Bach, Haydn, and Mozart. See also shawmshawm
, double-reed woodwind instrument used in Europe from the 13th through the 17th cent. The term denotes a family of instruments of different sizes. The shape and tone of the soprano shawm are comparable to those of the oboe, of which it is a precursor.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Oboe

 

a reed woodwind musical instrument. It originated in France in the second half of the 17th century from an instrument of the Middle Ages, the shawm (Schalmei).

The modern oboe is a straight wooden pipe consisting of a top joint, a middle joint, and a bell. It has 25 holes, of which 22-24 are covered by keys. The instrument uses a double reed made from a special type of cane. Two systems of oboes exist—German and French. The oboe of the French system, which has a better key construction and is distinguished by the purity of its intonation, is widespread; its sound is piercing, with a nasal timbre. The oboe occupies an important place among the woodwind instruments used in symphonic and operatic orchestras. It is also used as a solo and ensemble instrument. Types of oboes include the tenor oboe, or English horn; and the alto oboe, or oboe d’amore.

S. IA. LEVIN

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Oboe

[′ō‚bō]
(navigation)
An electronic navigation system utilizing a single-path round-trip system for determination of transmission times and distance; used for bombing in World War II.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

oboe

a woodwind instrument of the family that includes the bassoon and cor anglais, consisting of a conical tube fitted with a mouthpiece having a double reed. It has a penetrating nasal tone. Range: about two octaves plus a sixth upwards from B flat below middle C
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Range: [A.sub.3]-[E.sub.5] Oboe I, II, oboe da caccia (or taille, a tenor oboe), concerted organ, strings, b.c.
George Barnett, gained control of Yellow Oboe and made for Italy.
I haven't picked up the oboe since my junior year in college, where, incidentally, I sat first chair in the orchestra even though I did not practice once the entire time.
The callous Inspector Flores (Arturo Fleitas), who initially sees the oboe as a tool of the devil, finally melts under its warmth.
On beats 2-4 of the same bar, in place of repeated pitches the bassoon performs an inverted canon of beats 1-3 of the first oboe line.
Casadonte has even tried filming reed action "live" from inside the mouth, capturing the first images of clarinet and oboe reeds vibraitng while being played.
Neophytou studied the oboe at the Royal Academy of music in London.
For the music society concert at St Paul's Hall in Huddersfield on Monday, November 2, at 7.30pm, their programme includes Poulenc's Oboe Sonata, Glinka's Trio, the Sonatine by Ravel and works by Florent Schmitt, Canteloube, Saint-Saens and Mozart.
The first movement is described as a "dance with the devil." The devil motif is performed by the piano, and the oboe deftly engages, dances with, and triumphantly emerges from this dance unscathed.
Even though a few bars give me the feeling that the recording director could have been more meticulous, it is a minor matter, as listening to Veverka's oboe is a true delight, a spiritual experience even.
They described the stolen instrument as a "high value" oboe worth around pounds 4,500.
There are also a number of unusual instruments, such as wind and thunder machines, and the Heckelphone, a kind of baritone oboe.