OBSCURE

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OBSCURE

"A Formal Description of the Specification Language OBSCURE", J. Loeckx, TR A85/15, U Saarlandes, Saarbrucken, 1985.
References in classic literature ?
The picture appeared a vast and dim scene of evil, and I foresaw obscurely that I was destined to become the most wretched of human beings.
Poignant as it was, the sense of suffering caused by the miserable end of my brief, presumptuous love seemed to be blunted and deadened by the still stronger sense of something obscurely impending, something invisibly threatening, that Time was holding over our heads.
As it spoke, I discerned, obscurely, a child's face looking through the window.
He appeared to me to have obscurely hinted in his letter at some distant idea he had of seeing you in England here.
So long as visible or audible pain turns you sick; so long as your own pains drive you; so long as pain underlies your propositions about sin,--so long, I tell you, you are an animal, thinking a little less obscurely what an animal feels.
We have spoken to some people who knew the victim and would like to appeal to anyone else who may have known her, no matter how obscurely.
It's amusing and obscurely satisfying to perceive Root's rule that curved or slanted edges appear courtesy of the cut aluminum only, while lines where paint abuts paint are ruled and right-angled--as if the tight interiors were being squashed and molded by a separate kind of physics in the world beyond.
This gewgaw is central to the play's flimsy furbelow of a plot--as Anna herself might put it, obscurely.
So too in Khatibi the politics of love, the intrigue of desire, good and evil, the traditional and the modern move obscurely in the streets of Rabat, where "quelques chats errants qui dorment, de coutume, sous les voitures en sniffant l'odeur de l'essence.
Dave, proprietor and head cook at the obscurely named Clubway 41, raised his eyebrows and braced himself for another helping of Gordon's words of culinary wisdom.
My point -- and obscurely there is one -- is that no matter how much you want to make a man the ideal husband you fantasise about, if he ain't then he ain't.
The primary prop in the life of Babette (Christina Kirk) is a phone, used more often than not to wheedle money out of friends (the obscurely literary book she's working on is nearly there, you see).