OBSCURE

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OBSCURE

"A Formal Description of the Specification Language OBSCURE", J. Loeckx, TR A85/15, U Saarlandes, Saarbrucken, 1985.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although astronomers don't yet understand the nature of a Seyfert galaxy's obscuring ring or disk, light from these galaxies shows evidence that their centers often contain large quantities of intensely heated gas (SN: 4/27/85, p.
This judgment has finally confirmed what many motorists have always felt ( that they should not be convicted if trees and hedges overhanging or obscuring signs mean they cannot properly see the signs, and they are not given adequate notice of changes in the speed limit.
This judgment has finally confirmed what many motorists have always felt: that they should not be convicted if trees and hedges overhanging or obscuring signs mean they cannot properly see the signs.
South-southwesterly winds have blown smoke from fires in central and south Sumatra to Singapore and Malaysia, obscuring sunlight and reducing temperatures and visibility.
In retaliation, she said, someone went around noting other violations -- such as vegetation obscuring a street sign in front of her house -- and phoned them in.
This shrinkage, which is like a veil, is rapidly obscuring certain facets of our relationship with the cosmos and its Creator.
All these actions make use of different sets of muscles and von Hagens has flayed and peeled away the obscuring flesh that allows us to see the inner workings of the body.
The Safe-T-First system minimizes these concerns by providing continuous visible direction at ground level, ensuring an orderly, expeditious, safe evacuation of occupants in the event of power failure, smoke obscuring the exits and other natural or man-made disasters.
not the same person--this time it's Chizura Tomioka with a message box half obscuring her left eye.
Troubling to the anthropologist in me is Smith's overriding concentration on historical development toward a later period, thus obscuring the "thing" itself (a piece of music, a style, a treatise, etc.