obtuse

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obtuse

1. Maths
a. (of an angle) lying between 90? and 180?
b. (of a triangle) having one interior angle greater than 90?
2. (of a leaf or similar flat part) having a rounded or blunt tip
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

obtuse

[äb′tüs]
(botany)
Of a leaf, having a blunt or rounded free end.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
- Leaf margin seteso or obtusely serrate.....................10
Pronotal disc with shallow punctures irregularly distributed on disc, but less dense near midline; lateral margins obtusely angled, widest just behind middle, lateral marginal bead irregularly crenulate, with long setae; anterior marginal bead without setae; anterior angles obtuse, not prominent; posterior angles widely obtuse, rounded.
1C); the lateral margins of ninth tergite parallel, narrowed into two lobes with obtusely rounded apices, which are separated by a deep V-shaped notch in dorsal view (Fig.
According to the High Court, then, a clear difference exists between behaving unconscionably (or unconscientiously) and behaving obtusely or even callously.
(65) Following a paragraph in which she obtusely refers to herself, Antin writes of the scene: "she was interested ...
Dinesh D'Souza: If I was standing in front of a bush and I heard a voice, I wouldn't obtusely conclude that the bush is speaking.
This serves to elide political questions related to empire which Heart of Darkness obtusely raises by outlining the commercial context in which the man to whom "all Europe contributed" (HD 86) became a demigod in the Congo.
Here the responses of Italian philologists to this famous and controversial work exemplify the various inflections of philology during this politically turbulent period, from the obtusely positivistic pedantry of Giuseppe Zippel, the editor and translator of Die Kultur, to Federico Chabod's selective appropriation of Burkhardt's ideas on the birth of the modern state, and finally to Delio Cantimori's shifting attitude.
Jefferson (obtusely?) bought both Martha and Sally elegant clothes in Paris, and Sally attended Martha at social events.