contact

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Related to occlusal contact: occlusal adjustment

contact

1. 
a. a junction of two or more electrical conductors
b. the part of the conductors that makes the junction
c. the part of an electrical device to which such connections are made
2. any person who has been exposed to a contagious disease
3. an informal name for contact lens
4. of or relating to irritation or inflammation of the skin caused by touching the causative agent
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

contact

See eclipse.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Contact

 

the geometric concept signifying that at a certain point, two curves (or a curve and a surface) have a common tangent line or two surfaces have a common tangent plane. The order of contact is a characteristic of the proximity of two curves (a curve and a surface, or two surfaces) in the neighborhood of their common point.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

contact

[′kän‚takt]
(electricity)
(engineering)
Initial detection of an aircraft, ship, submarine, or other object on a radarscope or other detecting equipment.
(fluid mechanics)
The surface between two immiscible fluids contained in a reservoir.
(geology)
The surface between two different kinds of rocks.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

contact

A part which is an electric conductor and which provides a low-resistance path for current flow upon mating with another conducting part with which it is designed to operate.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

contact

i. An air traffic control term, which, when transmitted on the radio, means “Establish radio contact with … ”
ii. Visual contact by the pilot with another aircraft (friendly, hostile, or unidentified), or object, or target on the ground.
iii. To pick up the target on radar.
iv. A warning call by the pilot when starting a piston engine to the person swinging the propeller to indicate that the ignition system is about to be put on.
v. A mechanical hookup between a tanker and a receiver aircraft.
vi. The act of an aircraft touching down on a runway or another surface after being airborne, as in “the moment of contact.”
vii. Flying in weather and at an altitude from where ground features can be seen continuously, as in contact flying.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

contact

A metal bar or strip in a plug or smart card that touches a corresponding metal object in a socket or reader in order to enable current to pass. Contacts may be made of precious metals to avoid corrosion. See pin and smart card.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Influence of occlusal contact on cervical muscle activity during submaximal clenching.
Pain after endodontic therapy is of serious concern both to the dentist and patient.10 The results of the our study have shown that there was no significant effect on pain after root canal treatment in patients having occlusal reduction compared with patients in whom their occlusal contacts were left untreated.
Articulation II - Inter occlusal record with cen- tric stop: The occlusal contacts in the patient were recorded using an articulating paper (Arti- fol) 8 microns thick (Fig 1).
Previous studies have shown that changes in occlusal contacts may lead to functional disharmony between the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joint, resulting in excessive intra-articular pressure, a set of micro and macro traumas and subsequent joint degeneration, characteristic of TMD35.
A century of controversy regarding the benefit or detriment of occlusal contacts on the mediotrusive side.
In the present study it was found that open-bite was statistically correlated with accumulation of calculus in children, and children with erupting teeth, without occlusal contact, had a higher occurrence of calculus but this was not significant.
Based on assumption that maximum occlusal forces are generated and their redistribution is determined by the character of occlusal contacts in central occlusion, numerical experiments were performed with the created model's dental arches set into central occlusion position.
However, today it is possible to precisely measure the relative force of each occlusal contact, the timing of the oc- clusal contacts and specific muscle contraction levels, all simul- taneously.
Teeth 12 to 23 were prepared and provisional restorations made according to the diagnostic waxup of the study casts which were taken at the new OVD and after complete reestablishment of occlusal contacts (Figure 12).
According to Planas (12) (1997), the crossbite side presents a greater number of occlusal contacts in function, being the preferred chewing side.