bleeding

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Related to occult bleeding: hematochezia

bleeding

[′blēd·iŋ]
(chemical engineering)
The undesirable movement of certain components of a plastic material to the surface of a finished article. Also known as migration.
(engineering)
Natural separation of a liquid from a liquid-solid or semisolid mixture; for example, separation of oil from a stored lubricating grease, or water from freshly poured concrete. Also known as bleedout.
(materials)
The outward penetration of a coloring agent from a substrate through the surface coat of paint.
The movement of grout through a pavement from below a road surfacing material to the outer surface.
(textiles)
Referring to a fabric in which the dye is not fast and therefore comes out when the fabric is wet.

bleeding

1. The upward penetration of a coloring pigment from a substrate through a topcoat of paint.
2. The oozing of grout from below a road-surfacing material to the surface in hot weather.
3. Exudation of one or more components of a sealant, with possible absorption by adjacent porous surfaces.
4. The autogenous flow of mixing water within, or its emergence from, newly placed concrete or mortar; caused by the settlement of the solid materials within the mass or by drainage of mixing water; also called water gain.
5. The diffusion of coloring matter through a coating from the substrate, or the discoloration that arises from such a process.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 229 procedures using video capsule technology, 154 (67%) were performed because of occult bleeding and 75 (33%) because of overt bleeding.
Those with occult bleeding at randomization had similar rates of further bleeding regardless of randomization; 18% and 21% had further bleeding in the capsule endoscopy and radiography groups, respectively, the investigators noted.
Unlike the Hemoccult test, which detects any gastrointestinal bleeding, the InSure test is selective for occult bleeding.
However, stool samples taken after intense workouts or post-race have revealed occult bleeding in 7-30% of marathoners with occasional reports of major upper GI or lower GI hemorrhage also reported in runners.
Hidden or occult bleeding, while not a medical emergency, may signify the development of a gastroduodenal stress ulcer, or other pathology.
They reported a significant difference (p = 0.001) in occult bleeding for those infants who were only artificially fed, and for those infants who were partly breast fed and partly artificially fed (p = 0.05).
Mild reductions in renal function, occult bleeding and protein loss from the gut, and minor changes in organ function produced by NSAIDs in frail old people could contribute substantially to morbidity in ways yet to be fully understood.
These growths can cause either bright red blood or occult bleeding. Colorectal cancer is the second most common of all cancers in the United States and usually causes bleeding at some time.