occupancy rate

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occupancy rate

The total number of persons per room, housing unit, etc.
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According to data from STR, occupancy levels in the Middle East slipped 4.4 per cent to 72 per cent, with average daily rate (ADR) declining 4.5 per cent to $163.76.
The absolute occupancy level was the highest for a July in Sao Paulo since 2012, while the ADR level was the highest for the month since 2012.
Room occupancy levels in four-star properties are expected to reach 75 per cent by today, while restaurants and coffee shops are anticipating a significant increase in customers, majority tourists from neighbouring countries.
Occupancy levels in the Middle East moved up 2.6 per cent to 61.7 per cent during Q2, but average daily rate (ADR) and revenue per available room (RevPAR) dipped for the period, going down 7.2 per cent to $147.44 and 4.8 per cent to $91.03, respectively.
The occupancy level was the highest for an April since 2009.
Bed occupancy levels remained high well into March, leading to the worst crowding since records began.
Average occupancy levels in adult and paediatric critical care wards is higher in 2017 than in 2016 The average occupancy for adult wards during the festive period rose from 81.2% to 81.9%, while it rose from 74.6% to 77.8% on paediatric wards.
At the submarket level, the highest absolute occupancy levels were reported in Jumeirah Palm & Beaches at 74.9 per cent; and the Deira & Airport Area at 72.0 per cent.
Ms Paterson said: "Our neonatal clinical commissioners say that the occupancy level that neonatal units must use when looking at safety and staffing is 80% occupancy.
Senior executives at The Imperial and Hyatt Regency hotels also said that there is a drop in occupancy level compared to last year in the premium segment.
Even with an occupancy level of 95% of the total design capacity of a prison estate, it becomes nigh impossible for a prison service to deliver what is required of it, and more particularly, to ensure respect for inmates' human dignity."
Only 14 hospitals in the Twin Cities were able to maintain an occupancy level above 50%, and only 3 had an occupancy level above 60 percent.[1][2] The primary causes of this statistic were reduced admissions and shorter stays.