occupant


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occupant

1. Law a person who has possession of something, esp an estate, house, etc.; tenant
2. Law a person who acquires by occupancy the title to something previously without an owner
References in classic literature ?
This man seemed to me to lean over the cornice, and timidly whisper his half truth to the rude occupants who really knew it better than he.
Oars were shipped, and its occupants waited for us to heave to and take them aboard.
It was a weird place in itself, but its occupants made it seem like a scene from the Seven Circles of Dante.
There were racks for weapons, and slightly raised platforms for the sleeping silks and furs of the warriors, but now its only occupants were two of the therns who had been of the party with Thurid and Matai Shang.
For two days Tarzan sought futilely for some clew to the whereabouts of the machine or its occupants.
Their occupants were eager to join the battle, for they thought that their foes were white men and their native porters.
She echoed the maledictions that the occupants of the gallery showered on this individual when his lines compelled him to expose his extreme selfishness.
After all these years I am still confident that excavations which I have neither the legal right to undertake nor the wealth to make would disclose the secret of the disappearance of my unhappy friend, and possibly of the former occupants and owners of the deserted and now destroyed house.
I expected a blow the moment that I came within the view of the occupants, but no blow fell.
It doesn't look--exactly--as if the occupants would be kindred spirits, Anne, does it?
The close green walls of privet, that had bordered the principal walk, were two-thirds withered away, and the rest grown beyond all reasonable bounds; the old boxwood swan, that sat beside the scraper, had lost its neck and half its body: the castellated towers of laurel in the middle of the garden, the gigantic warrior that stood on one side of the gateway, and the lion that guarded the other, were sprouted into such fantastic shapes as resembled nothing either in heaven or earth, or in the waters under the earth; but, to my young imagination, they presented all of them a goblinish appearance, that harmonised well with the ghostly legions and dark traditions our old nurse had told us respecting the haunted hall and its departed occupants.
Meanwhile, time had not stood still for the occupants of the great house on the hill.