occupational medicine


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occupational medicine

[‚ä·kyə′pā·shən·əl ′med·i·sən]
(medicine)
The branch of medicine which deals with the relationship of humans to their occupations, for the purpose of the prevention of disease and injury and the promotion of optimal health, productivity, and social adjustment.
References in periodicals archive ?
As for advances in technology that could impact paradigm shifts in the practice of occupational medicine, one must understand the meaning of the internet of things, big data, bioinformatics, precision medicine, artificial intelligence (machine learning, clinical decision support, etc.), robotics, and block chain technology.
When deciding about medical fitness for work, occupational medicine specialists consider not only the general health of the employee but also the workplace, taking into account the psychological and physical environment as well as any implications this may have on the employees' health.
Occupational Medicine and Health focuses on providing medical care to employees with workplace injuries or illness using Worker's Compensation guidelines where appropriate; medical clearance for employees in accordance with employer needs and governmental requirements; and supports employers in health and safety efforts under OSHA and other governmental programs.
Reichle is no stranger to the pain associated with acute and chronic injuries, having spent over 21 years as an occupational medicine specialist in the Portland area.
President of the Society of Occupational Medicine Dr Richard Heron believes taking care of older workers will be a key for future businesses.
Hicks has served as an occupational medicine physician in private practice and as site medical director with the University of Massachusetts Correctional Health.
Issues will be addressed by speakers Angela Thompson, of PROHMS Professional Occupational Health Medical Services; Vanessa Scrimshaw, of New Dawn Resources; and Joanne Crawford, of the Institute of Occupational Medicine.
The Society of Occupational Medicine is also urging the workforce to cover up as research has found skin cancer in construction workers could be as common as asbestos-related disease.
But results of a new study conducted in a large, multisite occupational medicine program contradict both of these historical findings, Dr.
Musculoskeletal, sports, and occupational medicine.
In the Occupational Medicine journal, the scientists wrote: "Any association between work-related stress and the common cold may be accentuated in males by their reaction to experiencing a cold and attenuated in females by their more stoical response."

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