occupational medicine


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occupational medicine

[‚ä·kyə′pā·shən·əl ′med·i·sən]
(medicine)
The branch of medicine which deals with the relationship of humans to their occupations, for the purpose of the prevention of disease and injury and the promotion of optimal health, productivity, and social adjustment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now in its third year, three occupational medicine residents have completed the block rotation.
Occupational medicine clinics look tired after a few years, and businesses that direct workers to them can relocate.
Occupational medicine specialists can help adjusters avoid claim "creep" in instances where it is questionable whether an aggravation or exacerbation is due to an on-the-job injury.
He is board certified in both occupational medicine and medical toxicology by the American Board of Preventive Medicine and is a fellow of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
To order Occupational Medicine Practice Guidelines, call OEM Press in Beverly, Mass.
Early in the century occupational medicine and private workmen's compensation ensured that the problem would remain in the work place.
Family physicians are increasingly occupying a new market niche: freestanding occupational medicine clinics.
Workers' compensation costs can be reduced significantly when injured workers are treated by occupational medicine specialists under managed care programs, according to a 1996 study in Washington state.
The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine planned to revise their Handbook of Occupational Medicine, but the result was so expanded and changed in scope that they decided to change the title.
Mary's Occu-Med and Occupational Medicine Clinic have doubled each year since the centers were opened in 1988, she says.
Rosenman, a specialist in occupational medicine at the Michigan State University Clinical Center in East Lansing.
Based on interviews with corporate medical directors and others involved a occupational medicine, Walsh insightfully portrays theconflicts that doctors employed by corporations encounter in integrating their professional commitment to support the health of workers and their bureaucratic obligation to support the goals and interests of their corporate employers.

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