profile

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profile

1. a view or representation of an object, esp a building, in contour or outline
2. a vertical section of soil from the ground surface to the parent rock showing the different horizons
3. 
a. a vertical section of part of the earth's crust showing the layers of rock
b. a representation of such a section
4. the outline of the shape of a river valley either from source to mouth (long profile) or at right angles to the flow of the river (cross profile)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Profile

An outline of a form or structure seen or represented from the side, or one formed by a vertical plane passed through an object at right angles to one of its main horizontal dimensions.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

profile

[′prō‚fīl]
(geology)
The outline formed by the intersection of the plane of a vertical section and the ground surface. Also known as topographic profile.
Data recorded by a single line of receivers from one shot point in seismic prospecting.
(geophysics)
A graphic representation of the variation of one property, such as gravity, usually as ordinate, with respect to another property, usually linear, such as distance.
(hydrology)
A vertical section of a potentiometric surface, such as a water table.
(petrology)
In structural petrology, a cross section of a homoaxial structure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

profile

1. A guide used to set out brick work or block work accurately.
3. A vertical section of the surface of the ground, or of underlying strata, or both, along any fixed line. On a highway, the profile is usually taken along the center line.
4. In architectural drawing, the outline of a vertical section.
5. British term for batter board.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

profile

The orthogonal projection of flight path or a portion on the vertical surface containing the nominal track.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

PROFILE

(1)
Simple language for matching and scoring data. "User's Manual for the PROFILE System", Cambridge Computer Assoc (May 1974).

profile

(2)
A control file for a program, especially a text file automatically read from each user's home directory and intended to be easily modified by the user in order to customise the program's behaviour. Used to avoid hard-coded choices (see also dot file, rc file).

profile

(3)
A report on the amounts of time spent in each routine of a program, used to find and tune away the hot spots in it. This sense is often verbed. Some profiling modes report units other than time (such as call counts) and/or report at granularities other than per-routine, but the idea is similar.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

profile

(1) A description of an individual, organization, publication or other entity. See user profile and social networking site.

(2) A list of user preferences. See user profile.

(3) A report of processing time spent within the routines of an executing program in order to figure out how to optimize the code for greater efficiency.

(4) A list of parameters read by a program in order to modify its behavior.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
A consideration of these upcoming changes in evaluation requirements and the implications for the occupational profile makes this a paramount concern in current practice.
For example, the occupational profile for geographers lists items such as:
The AOTA (2014) suggests that a client's occupational profile should contain information about what the client finds important and meaningful, as well as which occupations the client feels successful performing.
The 2016-17 OOH contains detailed career information in 329 occupational profiles, covering 83 percent of the jobs in the U.S.
Where the purpose of the assessment is purely related to professional advancement, qualifications are assessed against occupational profiles. The formalization of occupational profiles other than those covered by the Occupational Councils is a fairly recent development.
Occupational employment statistics: 2012 occupational profiles. Retrieved from www.bls.gov/oeslcurrent/oes_stru.htm#21-0000
Drawing extensively on Chartist regional and local newspapers, Fraser identifies similar occupational profiles for Scottish and English Chartists.
'I think additional work is definitely needed to clarify occupational profiles and to what degree technical skills are applicable and transferrable, and to what degree some retraining is required.'
Thus, PMRs only reflect the industrial and occupational profiles of those states in those years.
Users can link directly from occupational profiles to the education and training providers who can help them prepare for careers in health care, building and construction, manufacturing and information technology.
The following areas of direction and strategies for CTE were identified in the study countries: (1) occupational profiles, core occupations, and cooperation between education and industries in Europe; (2) tech prep and improvements in postsecondary education in the United States; and (3) implementation of a coherent CTE system, collaboration between schools and industries, and school-industry incubation practices in Taiwan.
Rightly contesting any facile assumptions that Methodists developed a "monolithic middle-class culture," it argues instead for a culture of "overlapping, competing social and religious respectabilities." The evidence for this conclusion, however, comes from selected Ontario towns rather than prairie data and focuses exclusively on occupational profiles without taking into consideration the close fit between evangelical morals and middle class respectability.

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