occupational structure

occupational structure

the DIVISION OF LABOUR within the economy, and by extension also society, largely in sectoral and status terms. Sectorally, the division of occupations has been classified into primary, secondary and tertiary sectors, a schema commonly used by sociologists studying INDUSTRIALIZATION and POSTINDUSTRIAL SOCIETY. In status terms the concept centrally informs the study of socioeconomic categories (CLASSES) for, in Parkin's (1971) classic statement, ‘The backbone of the class structure … of modern Western society, is the occupational order’.

Probably the best-known and most-used schema (within the UK) has been developed by GOLDTHORPE et al. (1980), derived from the earlier Hope-Goldthorpe Scales (see OCCUPATIONAL SCALES) for the analysis of SOCIAL MOBILITY. The concept has, historically been blind to the involvement of women in the workforce, tending to focus on the occupations of adult males only (Walby, 1986).

References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to identifying occupational structure and economic activity for employees as per a number of variables including average of annual salaries.
It also aims to identifying occupational structure and economic activity for employees as per a number of variables including average of annual salaries.
This is not to deny that the occupational structure is changing.
It also affected the employment structure, accelerating structural change and generalising a pattern of job polarisation across Europe, in which employment in mid-paid jobs declined more than in jobs at the top and bottom of the occupational structure.
In accessing, a certain occupational status an important role is played by a series of factors such as the residence area, quality of the educational process, existing occupational structure within the society etc.
We then go further, examining how observed patterns in Inner London may be explained by patterns of domestic and international migration, the class origins of migrants, and change in the occupational structure of a given region over time.
In particular, it compares the occupational structure of elderly workers with that of workers aged 45 through 65.
Moreover, official projections suggest continued gradual change in the occupational structure in the next 10 years.
The industrial and occupational structure in the North is very different.
This is not to be confused with occupational structure, which refers to the distribution of workers between occupations.
Among their topics are the flow of soul: a sociological study of generosity in England and Wales 2001-11, a longitudinal perspective on social connectedness and generalized trust, social capital and the social relations of occupational structure, social capital and life satisfaction in Australia, and institution-spanning social capital and its income returns in China.
Dr John Philpott, director of the Jobs Economist, said: "Our complex and fluid occupational structure explains why there are so many conflicting views on how the British way of work is changing.

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